Robert Herrick Quotes

Thou art my life, my love, my heart, The very eyes of me: And hast command of every part To live and die for thee.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Anthea, Who May Command Him Anything (l. 17-20). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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And after they have shown their pride Like you a while, they glide Into the grave.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Blossoms (l. 16-18). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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We die, As your hours do, and dry Away, Like to the summer's rain; Or as the pearls of morning's dew
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Daffodils (l. 15-19). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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Fair daffodils, we weep to see You haste away so soon: As yet the early-rising sun Has not attained his noon.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet, clergyman. repr. In The Poems of Robert Herrick, ed. L.C. Martin (1956). To Daffodils, st. 1, Hesperides (1648).
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Fair daffodils, we weep to see You haste away so soon:
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Daffodils (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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Shut not so soon; the dull-eyed night Has not yet begun To make a seizure on the light, Or to seal up the sun.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Daisies, Not to Shut So Soon (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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When as that Rubie, which you weare, Sunk from the tip of your soft eare, Will last to be a precious Stone, When all your world of Beautie 's gone.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Dianeme (l. 7-10). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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I dare not ask a kiss, I dare not beg a smile, Lest having that, or this, I might grow proud the while. No, no, the utmost share Of my desire shall be Only to kiss that air That lately kissed thee.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Electra (l. 1-8). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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Go, pretty child, and bear this flower Unto thy little Saviour; And tell Him, by that bud now blown, He is the Rose of Sharon known.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To His Saviour, a Child; a Present, by a Child (l. 1-4). . . Our Holidays in Poetry. Mildred P. Harrington and Josephine H. Thomas, comps. (1929) The H. W. Wilson Company.
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Now is the time for mirth, Nor cheek or tongue be dumb; For with the flowery earth The golden pomp is come.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Live Merrily, and to Trust to Good Verses (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
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