Robert Herrick Quotes

And when all bodies meet In Lethe to be drowned, Then only numbers sweet With endless life are crowned.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Live Merrily, and to Trust to Good Verses (l. 49-52). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
(1) (0)
Ye have been fresh and green, Ye have been fill'd with flowers: And ye the Walks have been Where Maids have spent their houres.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Meadows (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
(0) (1)
That having ease me given, With full delight, I leave this light; And take my flight For Heaven.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Music, to Becalm His Fever (l. 29-33). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
(1) (0)
Then, lastly, let some weekly strewings be Devoted to the memory of me: Then shall my ghost not walk about, but keep Still in the cool and silent shades of sleep.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Perilla (l. 15-18). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
(0) (1)
Laid out for death, let thy last kindness be With leaves and moss-work for to cover me: And while the wood-nymphs my cold corpse inter, Sing thou my dirge, sweet-warbling chorister! For epitaph, in foliage, next write this: Here, here the tomb of Robin Herrick is.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Robin Redbreast (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
(0) (1)
Thou gav'st me life, but mortal; for that one Favour I'll make full satisfaction: For my life mortal, rise from out thy hearse, And take a life immortal from my verse.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To the Reverend Shade of His Religious Father (l. 13-16). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
(0) (1)
Then be not coy, but use your time; And while ye may, go marry: For having lost but once your prime, You may for ever tarry.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet, clergyman. repr. In The Poems of Robert Herrick, ed. L.C. Martin (1956). To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, st. 4, Hesperides (1648).
(4) (1)
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying: And this same flower that smiles to-day, To-morrow will be dying.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet, clergyman. repr. In The Poems of Robert Herrick, ed. L.C. Martin (1956). To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, st. 1, Hesperides (1648).
(11) (0)
Gather ye rosebuds while ye may: Old Time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles today, Tomorrow will be dying.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(6) (0)
Y'are the maiden posies, And so graced To be placed 'Fore damask roses. Yet though thus respected By-and-by Ye do lie, Poor girls, neglected.
Robert Herrick (1591-1674), British poet. To Violets (l. 9-16). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
(0) (1)