Robert Louis Stevenson Quotes

I should like to rise and go Where the golden apples grow;— Where below another sky Parrot islands anchored lie, And, watched by cockatoos and goats, Lonely Crusoes building boats;—
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Travel (l. 1-6). . . Faber Book of Children's Verse, The. Janet Adam Smith, comp. (1953; paperback 1963) Faber and Faber.
(19) (5)
For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move; to feel the needs and hitches of our life more nearly; to come down off this feather-bed of civilisation, and find the globe granite underfoot and strewn with cutting flints.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Travels with a Donkey, "Cheylard and Luc," (1879).
(17) (6)
This be the verse you grave for me: Here he lies where he longed to be; Home is the sailor, home from the sea, And the hunter home from the hill.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Under the wide and starry sky (l. 5-8). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
(44) (8)
Under the wide and starry sky, Dig the grave and let me lie. Glad did I live and gladly die, And I laid me down with a will. This be the verse you grave for me: Here he lies where he longed to be; Home is the sailor, home from sea. And the hunter home from the hill.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Underwoods, "Requiem," (1887). Inscribed on Stevenson's gravestone on Mount Vaea, Samoa, where Stevenson spent the last five years of his life. The inscription wrongly transcribes the penultimate line, "Home is the sailor, home from the sea."
(63) (3)
To travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, "El Dorado," (1881).
(130) (50)
The cruellest lies are often told in silence. A man may have sat in a room for hours and not opened his mouth, and yet come out of that room a disloyal friend or a vile calumniator.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, "Virginibus Puerisque," sct. 4 (1881).
(121) (42)
The very flexibility and ease which make men's friendships so agreeable while they endure, make them the easier to destroy and forget. And a man who has a few friends, or one who has a dozen (if there be any one so wealthy on this earth), cannot forget on how precarious a base his happiness reposes; and how by a stroke or two of fate—a death, a few light words, a piece of stamped paper, a woman's bright eyes—he may be left, in a month, destitute of all.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, title essay, sct. 1 (1881).
(8) (4)
He sows hurry and reaps indigestion.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, "An Apology for Idlers," (1881). Referring to "industrious fellows."
(88) (48)
Man is a creature who lives not upon bread alone, but principally by catchwords; and the little rift between the sexes is astonishingly widened by simply teaching one set of catchwords to the girls and another to the boys.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, "Virginibus Puerisque," sct. 2 (1881).
(17) (11)
Man is a creature who lives not upon bread alone, but principally by catchwords.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, title essay, pt. 2 (1881).
(18) (7)