Robert Louis Stevenson Quotes

And tell the other girls and boys Not to meddle with my toys.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. When I am grown to man's estate (l. 3-4). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.
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Away down the river, A hundred miles or more, Other little children Shall bring my boats ashore.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Where Go the Boats? (L. 13-16). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.
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Whenever the moon and stars are set, Whenever the wind is high, All night long in the dark and wet, A man goes riding by.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Windy Nights (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.
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By at the gallop he goes, and then By he comes back at the gallop again.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Windy Nights (l. 11-12). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.
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If you would grow great and stately, You must try to walk sedately.
Robert Louis Stevenson (19th century), British writer, poet. A Child's Garden of Verses, "Good and Bad Children," (1885).
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If your morals make you dreary, depend upon it they are wrong. I do not say "give them up," for they may be all you have; but conceal them like a vice, lest they should spoil the lives of better and simpler people.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Across the Plains, "A Christmas Sermon," sct. 2 (1892).
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So long as we are loved by others I should say that we are almost indispensable; and no man is useless while he has a friend.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Across the Plains, "Lay Morals," (1892).
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To make our idea of morality centre on forbidden acts is to defile the imagination and to introduce into our judgments of our fellow-men a secret element of gusto.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Across the Plains, ch. 12 (1892).
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Everyone lives by selling something, whatever be his right to it.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Across the Plains, "Beggars," sct. 3 (1892).
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A faculty for idleness implies a catholic appetite and a strong sense of personal identity.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. "An Apology for Idlers," Virginibus Puerisque (1881).
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