Robert Louis Stevenson Quotes

All speech, written or spoken, is a dead language, until it finds a willing and prepared hearer.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 26 (1924). Reflections and Remarks on Human Life, sct. 3 (first published 1878).
It is the mark of a good action that it appears inevitable in retrospect.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 26 (1924). "Reflections and Remarks on Human Life," sct. 4 (1878).
I have done my fiddling so long under Vesuvius that I have almost forgotten to play, and can only wait for the eruption and think it long of coming. Literally no man has more wholly outlived life than I. And still it's good fun.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Stevenson's Letters to Charles Baxter (1956). Closing lines of letter written a few months before Stevenson's death in Samoa.
When it comes to my own turn to lay my weapons down, I shall do so with thankfulness and fatigue, and whatever be my destiny afterward, I shall be glad to lie down with my fathers in honour. It is human at least, if not divine.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Letter, autumn 1894. Stevenson's Letters to Charles Baxter (1956). Stevenson died in December of that year.