Robert Louis Stevenson Quotes

There is a fellowship more quiet even than solitude, and which, rightly understood, is solitude made perfect.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. "A Night Among the Pines," Travels With a Donkey (1879).
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The outer world, from which we cower into our houses, seemed after all a gentle habitable place; and night after night a man's bed, it seemed, was laid and waiting for him in the fields, where God keeps an open house.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. "A Night Among the Pines," Travels With a Donkey (1879).
(2) (3)
Night is a dead monotonous period under a roof; but in the open world it passes lightly, with its stars and dews and perfumes, and the hours are marked by changes in the face of Nature. What seems a kind of temporal death to people choked between walls and curtains, is only a light and living slumber to the man who sleeps afield.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. "A Night Among the Pines," Travels with a Donkey (1879).
(2) (4)
Blows the wind to-day, and the sun and the rain are flying, Blows the wind on the moors to-day and now, Where about the graves of the martyrs the whaups are crying, My heart remembers how!
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Blows the Wind Today (l. 1-4). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
(4) (1)
The frost was on the village roofs as white as ocean foam; The good red fires were burning bright in every 'longshore home; The windows sparkled clear, and the chimneys volleyed out; And I vow we sniffed the victuals as the vessel went about.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Christmas at Sea (l. 17-20). . . Oxford Book of Travel Verse, The. Kevin Crossley-Holland, ed. (1986) Oxford University Press.
(3) (2)
And they heaved a mighty breath, every soul on board but me, As they saw her nose again pointing handsome out to sea; But all that I could think of, in the darkness and the cold, Was just that I was leaving home and my folks were growing old.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Christmas at Sea (l. 41-44). . . Oxford Book of Travel Verse, The. Kevin Crossley-Holland, ed. (1986) Oxford University Press.
(5) (2)
Most of our pocket wisdom is conceived for the use of mediocre people, to discourage them from ambitious attempts, and generally console them in their mediocrity.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. "Crabbed Age and Youth," Virginibus Puerisque (1881).
(6) (3)
Some people swallow the universe like a pill; they travel on through the world, like smiling images pushed from behind.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. "Crabbed Age and Youth," Virginibus Puerisque (1881).
(6) (2)
For God's sake give me the young man who has brains enough to make a fool of himself!
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. "Crabbed Age and Youth," Virginibus Puerisque (1881).
(9) (2)
Faster than fairies, faster than witches, Bridges and houses, hedges and ditches; And charging along like troops in a battle, All through the meadows the horses and cattle;
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish poet. From a Railway Carriage (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.
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