Robert Louis Stevenson Quotes

Cruel children, crying babies, All grow up as geese and gabies, Hated, as their age increases, By their nephews and their nieces.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Good and Bad Children (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.
(1) (6)
The world is so full of a number of things, I'm sure we should all be as happy as kings.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Happy Thought (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.
(6) (3)
O to dream, O to awake and wander There, and with delight to take and render, Through the trance of silence, Quiet breath; Lo! for there, among the flowers and grasses, Only the mightier movement sounds and passes; Only winds and rivers, Life and death.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. In the Highlands (l. 17-24). . . Oxford Book of Scottish Verse, The. John MacQueen and Tom Scott, comps. (1966) Oxford University Press.
(1) (3)
Pieces of eight! pieces of eight! pieces of eight!
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Long John Silver's parrot, Cap'n Flint, in Treasure Island, pt 1, ch. 10 (1883). "Pieces of eight" were the old Spanish silver peso of eight reals—marked with an "8"Mcurrent in the 18th and 19th centuries.
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my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy-head, Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. My Shadow (l. 15-16). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.
(1) (2)
I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me, And what can be the use of him is more than I can see. He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head; And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. My Shadow (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.
(4) (1)
Trusty, dusky, vivid, true, With eyes of gold and bramble-dew, Steel-true and blade-straight The great artificer Made my mate.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. My Wife, Songs of Travel (1896). The lines "Steel-true, blade-straight" are inscribed on the gravestone of Arthur Conan Doyle, Hampshire, England.
(7) (0)
Must we to bed indeed? Well then, Let us arise and go like men, And face with an undaunted tread The long black passage up to bed.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. North-West Passage. Good-Night, A Child's Garden of Verses (1885).
(1) (1)
I never weary of great churches. It is my favourite kind of mountain scenery. Mankind was never so happily inspired as when it made a cathedral.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. "Noyons Cathedral," An Inland Voyage (1878).
(4) (1)
Each has his own tree of ancestors, but at the top of all sits Probably Arboreal.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. "Pastoral," ch. 6, Memories and Portraits (1887).
(3) (1)