Robert Louis Stevenson Quotes

Our business in this world is not to succeed, but to continue to fail, in good spirits.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 26 (1924). "Reflections and Remarks on Human Life," sct. 4 (1878).
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All speech, written or spoken, is a dead language, until it finds a willing and prepared hearer.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 26 (1924). Reflections and Remarks on Human Life, sct. 3 (first published 1878).
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It is the mark of a good action that it appears inevitable in retrospect.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 26 (1924). "Reflections and Remarks on Human Life," sct. 4 (1878).
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And this shall be for music when no one else is near, The fine song for singing, the rare song to hear! That only I remember, that only you admire, Of the broad road that stretches and the roadside fire.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Romance (l. 9-12). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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God, if this were enough, That I see things bare to the buff
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Songs of Travel: If This Were Faith (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
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With the half of a broken hope for a pillow at night That somehow the right is the right And the smooth shall bloom from the rough: Lord, if that were enough?
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. Songs of Travel: If This Were Faith (l. 33-36). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
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I have done my fiddling so long under Vesuvius that I have almost forgotten to play, and can only wait for the eruption and think it long of coming. Literally no man has more wholly outlived life than I. And still it's good fun.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Stevenson's Letters to Charles Baxter (1956). Closing lines of letter written a few months before Stevenson's death in Samoa.
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When it comes to my own turn to lay my weapons down, I shall do so with thankfulness and fatigue, and whatever be my destiny afterward, I shall be glad to lie down with my fathers in honour. It is human at least, if not divine.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Letter, autumn 1894. Stevenson's Letters to Charles Baxter (1956). Stevenson died in December of that year.
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The child that is not clean and neat, With lots of toys and things to eat, He is a naughty child, I'm sure— Or else his dear Papa is poor.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish writer, poet. "System," A Child's Garden of Verses (1885).
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Marriage is one long conversation, chequered by disputes.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. (Originally published 1882). Talk and Talkers, paper 2, Memories and Portraits (1887).
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