Robinson Jeffers Quotes

Be great, carve deep your heel-marks. The states of the next age will no doubt remember you, and edge their love of freedom with contempt of luxury.
Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962), U.S. poet. Shine, Republic (l. 11-12). . . Faber Book of Political Verse, The. Tom Paulin, ed. (1986) Faber and Faber; Faber Book of Popular Verse, The. (1971) Faber and Faber (This book is the same as The Gambit Book of Popular Verse [GBP]);.
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And you, America, that passion made you. You were not born to prosperity, you were born to love freedom. You did not say "en masse," you said "independence." But we cannot have all the luxuries and freedom also.
Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962), U.S. poet. Shine, Republic (l. 7-8). . . Faber Book of Political Verse, The. Tom Paulin, ed. (1986) Faber and Faber; Faber Book of Popular Verse, The. (1971) Faber and Faber (This book is the same as The Gambit Book of Popular Verse [GBP]);.
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headland beyond stormy headland plunging like dolphins through the gray sea-smoke Into pale sea, look west at the hill of water: it is half the planet: this dome, this half-globe, this bulging Eyeball of water,
Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962), U.S. poet. The Eye (l. 10-12). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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man will be blotted out, the blithe earth die, the brave sun Die blind and blacken to the heart: Yet stones have stood for a thousand years, and pained thoughts found The honey of peace in old poems.
Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962), U.S. poet. To the Stone-Cutters (l. 7-10). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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I tell you solemnly That I was sorry to have disappointed him. To be eaten by that beak and become part of him, to share those wings and those eyes— What a sublime end of one's body, what an enskyment; what a life after death.
Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962), U.S. poet. Vulture (l. 9-11). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Unmeasured power, incredible passion, enormous craft: no thought apparent but burns darkly Smothered with its own smoke in the human brain-vault: no thought outside; a certain measure in phenomena: The fountains of the boiling stars, the flowers on the foreland, the ever-returning roses of dawn.
Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962), U.S. poet. Apology for Bad Dreams (l. 66-68). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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what are we, The beast that walks upright, with speaking lips And little hair, to think we should always be fed, Sheltered, intact, and self-controlled?
Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962), U.S. poet. Apology for Bad Dreams (l. 33-36). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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the ghosts of the tribe Crouch in the nights beside the ghost of a fire, they try to remember the sunlight, Light has died out of their skies.
Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962), U.S. poet. Apology for Bad Dreams (l. 43-45). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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This coast crying out for tragedy like all beautiful places,
Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962), U.S. poet. Apology for Bad Dreams (l. 21). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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We are easy to manage, a gregarious people, Full of sentiment, clever at mechanics, and we love our luxuries.
Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962), U.S. poet. Ave Caesar (l. 7-8). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
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