Rupert Brooke Quotes

And I shall find some girl perhaps, And a better one than you, With eyes as wise, but kindlier, And lips as soft, but true, And I daresay she will do.
Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), British poet. The Chilterns, Collected Poems (1966).
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White plates and cups, clean-gleaming, Ringed with blue lines; and feathery, faery dust;
Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), British poet. The Great Lover (l. 27-28). . . Modern British Poetry. Louis Untermeyer, ed. (7th rev. ed., 1962) Harcourt, Brace and Company.
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Nothing remains. O dear my loves, O faithless, once again This one last gift I give: that after men Shall know, and later lovers, far-removed Praise you, "All these were lovely"; say, "He loved."
Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), British poet. The Great Lover (l. 72-76). . . Modern British Poetry. Louis Untermeyer, ed. (7th rev. ed., 1962) Harcourt, Brace and Company.
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Sleep; and high places; footprints in the dew;
Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), British poet. The Great Lover (l. 55). . . Modern British Poetry. Louis Untermeyer, ed. (7th rev. ed., 1962) Harcourt, Brace and Company.
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The pain, the calm, and the astonishment, Desire illimitable, and still content, And all dear names men use, to cheat despair,
Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), British poet. The Great Lover (l. 3-5). . . Modern British Poetry. Louis Untermeyer, ed. (7th rev. ed., 1962) Harcourt, Brace and Company.
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The cool kindliness of sheets, that soon Smooth away trouble; and the rough male kiss Of blankets.
Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), British poet. The Great Lover, 1914 and Other Poems (1915).
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Then, the cool kindliness of sheets, that soon Smooth away trouble; and the rough male kiss Of blankets; grainy wood; live hair that is Shining and free; blue-massing clouds; the keen Unpassioned beauty of a great machine;
Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), British poet. The Great Lover (l. 35-39). . . Modern British Poetry. Louis Untermeyer, ed. (7th rev. ed., 1962) Harcourt, Brace and Company.
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The comfortable smell of friendly fingers, Hair's fragrance, and the musty reek that lingers About dead leaves and last year's ferns. . . .
Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), British poet. The Great Lover (l. 42-44). . . Modern British Poetry. Louis Untermeyer, ed. (7th rev. ed., 1962) Harcourt, Brace and Company.
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But the best I've known Stays here, and changes, breaks, grows old, is blown About the winds of the world, and fades from brains Of living men, and dies.
Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), British poet. The Great Lover (l. 68-71). . . Modern British Poetry. Louis Untermeyer, ed. (7th rev. ed., 1962) Harcourt, Brace and Company.
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Say, is there Beauty yet to find? And Certainty? And Quiet kind? Deep meadows yet, for to forget The lies, and truths, and pain? . . . oh! Stands the Church clock at ten to three? And is there honey still for tea?
Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), British poet. The Old Vicarage, Grantchester (l. 136-141). . . Oxford Book of Twentieth-Century English Verse, The. Philip Larkin, ed. (1973) Oxford University Press.
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