Sébastien-Roch Nicolas Quotes

A man is not necessarily intelligent because he has plenty of ideas, any more than he is a good general because he has plenty of soldiers.
Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 2, no. 446 (1796).
Man may aspire to virtue, but he cannot reasonably aspire to truth.
Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 2, no. 342 (1796, trans. 1926).
A man without nobility cannot have kindliness; he can only have good nature.
Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 1, no. 116 (1796, trans. 1926).
Eminence without merit earns deference without esteem.
Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 1, no. 60 (1796, trans. 1926).
The art of the parenthesis is one of the greatest secrets of eloquence in Society.
Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 1, no. 243 (1796, trans. 1902).
It is commonly supposed that the art of pleasing is a wonderful aid in the pursuit of fortune; but the art of being bored is infinitely more successful.
Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 1, no. 116 (1796, trans. 1926).
People are governed with the head; kindness of heart is little use in chess.
Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 2, no. 522 (1796, trans. 1926).
Some things are easier to legalize than to legitimate.
Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 1, no. 134 (1796, trans. 1926).
Change of fashion is the tax levied by the industry of the poor on the vanity of the rich.
Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 1, no. 163, trans. by E. Powys Mathers (1926).
Only the history of free peoples is worth our attention; the history of men under a despotism is merely a collection of anecdotes.
Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 2, no. 487 (1796), trans. by E. Powys Mathers (1926).