Samuel Butler Quotes

Then spare the rod and spoil the child.
Samuel Butler (1612-1680), British poet. Hudibras, pt. 2, cto. 1 (1663-1678).
The dead should be judged like criminals, impartially, but they should be allowed the benefit of the doubt.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 223 (1951).
Belief like any other moving body follows the path of least resistance.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 220 (1951).
A hen is only an egg's way of making another egg.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Life and Habit, ch. 8 (1877).
Man is the only animal that can remain on friendly terms with the victims he intends to eat until he eats them.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, "Mind and Matter," (1912).
To die is but to leave off dying and do the thing once for all.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 255 (1951).
The public buys its opinions as it buys its meat, or takes in its milk, on the principle that it is cheaper to do this than to keep a cow. So it is, but the milk is more likely to be watered.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, "Sequel to Alps and Sanctuaries," (1912).
When the righteous man turneth away from his righteousness that he hath committed and doeth that which is neither lawful nor quite right, he will generally be found to have gained in amiability what he has lost in holiness.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, ch. 2 (1912).
I really do not see much use in exalting the humble and meek; they do not remain humble and meek long when they are exalted.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 220 (1951).
Men are seldom more commonplace than on supreme occasions.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, "Material for a Projected Sequel to Alps and Sanctuaries," (1912).