Samuel Butler Quotes

We can only proselytize fresh meat, putrid meat begins to have strong convictions of its own.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 70, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
I do not mind lying, but I hate inaccuracy.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, "Truth and Convenience: Falsehood," (1912).
Work with some men is as besetting a sin as idleness.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks (1951).
Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, "Life," (1912).
If there could be such a thing as the Mammon of Righteousness Christina would have assuredly made friends with it.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1903. Ernest Pontifex, or The Way of All Flesh, ch. 12, p. 48, Houghton Mifflin (1964).
One's stomach is one's internal environment.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, page 112, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
It is our less conscious thoughts and our less conscious actions which mainly mould our lives and the lives of those who spring from us.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. The Way of All Flesh, ch. 5 (1903).
Men should not try to overstrain their goodness more than any other faculty, bodily or mental.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 195, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
An empty house is like a stray dog or a body from which life has departed.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. The Way of All Flesh, ch. 72 (1903).
Death is only a larger kind of going abroad.
Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 144, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).