Samuel Daniel Quotes

If this be love, to clothe me with dark thoughts, Haunting untrodden paths to wail apart; My pleasures horror, music tragic notes, Tears in mine eyes and sorrow at my heart. If this be love, to live a living death, Then do I love and draw this weary breath.
Samuel Daniel (1562-1619), British poet. To Delia. OBSC. Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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When men shall find thy flow'r, thy glory, pass, And thou with careful brow, sitting alone, Received hast this message from thy glass, That tells the truth and says that All is gone;
Samuel Daniel (1562-1619), British poet. To Delia. OBSC. Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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When winter snows upon thy sable hairs, And frost of age hath nipped thy beauties near; When dark shall seem thy day that never clears, And all lies withered that was held so dear, Then take this picture which I here present thee, Limned with a pencil not all unworthy;
Samuel Daniel (1562-1619), British poet. To Delia. OBSC. Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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Beauty, sweet Love, is like the morning dew, Whose short refresh upon the tender green Cheers for a time, but till the sun doth shew, And straight 'tis gone as it had never been.
Samuel Daniel (1562-1619), British poet. To Delia. OBEV. Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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Short is the glory of the blushing rose, The hue which thou so carefully dost nourish, Yet which at length thou must be forced to lose.
Samuel Daniel (1562-1619), British poet. To Delia. OBEV. Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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Care-charmer Sleep, son of the sable Night, Brother to Death, in silent darkness born, Relieve my languish, and restore the light, With dark forgetting of my cares return.
Samuel Daniel (1562-1619), British poet. To Delia. OAEL-1. Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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No April can revive thy withered flowers, Whose blooming grace adorns thy glory now; Swift speeding Time, feathered with flying hours, Dissolves the beauty of the fairest brow. Oh let not then such riches waste in vain, But love whilst that thou mayst be loved again.
Samuel Daniel (1562-1619), British poet. To Delia. OBSC. Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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These are the arks, the trophies, I erect, That fortify thy name against old age; And these thy sacred virtues must protect Against the dark and Time's consuming rage.
Samuel Daniel (1562-1619), British poet. To Delia. OBEV. Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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My faith shall wax, when thou art in thy waning. The world shall find this miracle in me, That fire can burn when all the matter's spent: Then what my faith hath been thyself shalt see, And that thou wast unkind thou may'st repent.— Thou may'st repent that thou hast scorn'd my tears, When Winter snows upon thy sable hairs.
Samuel Daniel (1562-1619), British poet. To Delia. OBSC. Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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Fair nymph, if fame or honour were To be attained with ease, Then would I come and rest me there,
Samuel Daniel (1562-1619), British poet. Ulysses and the Siren (l. 9-11). OBEV. Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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