Samuel Johnson Quotes

Christianity is the highest perfection of humanity.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. letter, Aug. 13, 1766. The Letters of Samuel Johnson, vol. 1, no. 184, ed. R.W. Chapman (1952).
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His scorn of the great is repeated too often to be real; no man thinks much of that which he despises.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. "Pope," Lives of the English Poets (1779-1781). Referring to Alexander Pope.
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There are some sluggish men who are improved by drinking; as there are fruits that are not good until they are rotten.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 12, 1776, entry (1791).
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Never, my dear Sir, do you take it into your head that I do not love you; you may settle yourself in full confidence both of my love and my esteem; I love you as a kind man, I value you as a worthy man, and hope in time to reverence you as a man of exemplary piety.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. letter, Aug. 27, 1775, to James Boswell. The Letters of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, no. 431, ed. R.W. Chapman (1952).
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Slow rises worth, by poverty depressed:
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British writer. Poverty in London (l. 177). . . Oxford Book of English Verse. Sir Arthur Quille, ed. (1948) Oxford University Press.
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Politics are now nothing more than means of rising in the world. With this sole view do men engage in politics, and their whole conduct proceeds upon it.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 17, 1775 entry (1791).
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Tomorrow is an old deceiver, and his cheat never grows stale.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Letter, May 24, 1773, to Hester Thrale. The Letters of Samuel Johnson, vol. 1, no. 311, ed. R.W. Chapman (1952).
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A quibble is to Shakespeare what luminous vapours are to the traveller: he follows it at all adventures; it is sure to lead him out of his way and sure to engulf him in the mire.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Preface, Plays of William Shakespeare (1765).
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Sir, you have but two topics, yourself and me. I am sick of both.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, May 1776 (1791).
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There is no wisdom in useless and hopeless sorrow, but there is something in it so like virtue, that he who is wholly without it cannot be loved.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Letter, April 12, 1781, to Hester Thrale. The Letters of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, no. 722, ed. R.W. Chapman (1952).
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