Samuel Johnson Quotes

I would rather be attacked than unnoticed. For the worst thing you can do to an author is to be silent as to his works. An assault upon a town is a bad thing; but starving it is still worse.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, March 26, 1779 entry (1791).
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Superfluous lags the veteran on the stage, Till pitying Nature signs the last release, And bids afflicted worth retire to peace.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British writer. The Vanity of Human Wishes: The Tenth Satire of Juvenal Imitated (l. 308-310). . . The Complete English Poems [Samuel Johnson]. J. D. Fleeman, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Their Cause was gen'ral, their Supports were strong, Their Slaves were willing, and their Reign was long;
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British writer. Prologue Spoken by Mr. Garrick (l. 25-26). . . The Complete English Poems [Samuel Johnson]. J. D. Fleeman, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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There is no private house in which people can enjoy themselves so well as at a capital tavern.... No, Sir; there is nothing which has yet been contrived by man by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern or inn.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, March 21, 1776 (1791).
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Still raise for good the supplicating voice, But leave to heaven the measure and the choice,
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British writer. The Vanity of Human Wishes: The Tenth Satire of Juvenal Imitated (l. 351-352). . . The Complete English Poems [Samuel Johnson]. J. D. Fleeman, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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Hard is his lot, that here by Fortune plac'd, Must watch the wild Vicissitudes of Taste;
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British writer. Prologue Spoken by Mr. Garrick (l. 47-48). . . The Complete English Poems [Samuel Johnson]. J. D. Fleeman, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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You find no man, at all intellectual, who is willing to leave London. No, Sir, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, September 20, 1777 (1791).
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That life protracted is protracted woe.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British writer. The Vanity of Human Wishes: The Tenth Satire of Juvenal Imitated (l. 258). . . The Complete English Poems [Samuel Johnson]. J. D. Fleeman, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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The Stage but echoes back the publick Voice. The Drama's Laws the Drama's Patrons give, For we that live to please, must please to live.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British writer. Prologue Spoken by Mr. Garrick (l. 52-54). . . The Complete English Poems [Samuel Johnson]. J. D. Fleeman, ed. (1971) Penguin Books.
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I have thought of a pulley to raise me gradually; but that would give me pain, as it would counteract my natural inclination. I would have something that can dissipate the vis inertiae and give elasticity to the muscles.... We can heat the body, we can cool it; we can give it tension or relaxation; and surely it is possible to bring it into a state in which rising from bed will not be a pain.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, Sept. 19, 1777 (1791).
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