Samuel Johnson Quotes

Nothing is more common than mutual dislike, where mutual approbation is particularly expected.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson (1791). Letter, May 1, 1780, to Mrs. Thrale.
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It is very strange, and very melancholy, that the paucity of human pleasures should persuade us ever to call hunting one of them.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. In Johnsonian Miscellanies, vol. 1, p. 288, ed. George Birkbeck Hill (1897). Quoted in Anecdotes of Samuel Johnson (1786).
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That fellow seems to me to possess but one idea, and that is a wrong one.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, entry for 1770 (1791).
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I had rather see the portrait of a dog that I know, than all the allegorical paintings they can show me in the world.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. In Johnsonian Miscellanies, vol. 2, p. 15, ed. George Birkbeck Hill (1891). Quoted in "Apophthegms, Sentiments, Opinions," vol. 11, Works, ed. Sir John Hawkins (1787-1789).
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If a madman were to come into this room with a stick in his hand, no doubt we should pity the state of his mind; but our primary consideration would be to take care of ourselves. We should knock him down first, and pity him afterwards.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 3, 1776 entry (1791).
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Great abilites are not requisite for an Historian; for in historical composition, all the greatest powers of the human mind are quiescent. He has facts ready to his hand; so there is no exercise of invention. Imagination is not required in any degree; only about as much as is used in the lowest kinds of poetry. Some penetration, accuracy, and colouring, will fit a man for the task, if he can give the application which is necessary.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, July 6, 1763 (1791).
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Surely life, if it be not long, is tedious, since we are forced to call in the assistance of so many trifles to rid us of our time, of that time which never can return.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Letter, June 10, 1761. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson (1791).
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No money is better spent than what is laid out for domestic satisfaction.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 14, 1776 (1791).
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Life will not bear refinement. You must do as other people do.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, Sept. 19, 1777 (1791). Johnson was advising Boswell not to "refine" in the education of his children.
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Small debts are like small shot; they are rattling on every side, and can scarcely be escaped without a wound: great debts are like cannon; of loud noise, but little danger.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson (1791). Letter, 1759, to Joseph Simpson.
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