Samuel Johnson Quotes

A Judge may be a farmer; but he is not to geld his own pigs. A Judge may play a little at cards for his own amusement; but he is not to play at marbles, or chuck farthing in the Piazza.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 6, 1775 (1791).
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A man who has not been in Italy, is always conscious of an inferiority.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 11, 1776 (1791). Said over supper with James Boswell and the Corsican patriot Pasquale Paoli.
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The Irish are a fair people; they never speak well of one another.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, Feb. 1775 (1791).
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Milton, Madam, was a genius that could cut a Colossus from a rock; but he could not carve heads upon cherry-stones.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, June 13, 1784 (1791). Said to author Hannah More when she wondered how a poet capable of writing Paradise Lost had written such poor sonnets.
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If you are idle, be not solitary; if you are solitary, be not idle.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. letter, Oct. 27, 1779, to James Boswell. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson (1791).
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Men hate more steadily than they love.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson, September 15, 1777 (1791).
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There is, indeed, nothing that so much seduces reason from vigilance, as the thought of passing life with an amiable woman.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. letter, Dec. 21, 1762. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson (1791).
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I would advise you Sir, to study algebra, if you are not already an adept in it: your head would be less muddy, and you will leave off tormenting your neighbours about paper and packthread, while we all live together in a world that is bursting with sin and sorrow.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. In Johnsonian Miscellanies, vol. 1, p. 301 (1897). Quoted in Hester Piozzi, Anecdotes of Samuel Johnson (1786). remark to a warehouse packer. Mrs. Piozzi also recorded that "when Mr. Johnson felt his fancy, or fancied he felt it, disordered, his constant recurrence was to the study of arithmetic."
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He who praises everybody, praises nobody.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. First published in Works, vol. 11, p. 216 (1787). Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, vol. 3, note, ed. George Birkbeck Hill, revised L.F. Powell (1934).
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A man seldom thinks with more earnestness of anything than he does of his dinner.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. In Johnsonian Miscellanies, vol. 1, ed. George Birkbeck Hill (1897). Quoted in Hester Piozzi, Anecdotes of Samuel Johnson (1786).
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