Samuel Johnson Quotes

Sir, I do not call a gamester a dishonest man; but I call him an unsocial man, an unprofitable man. Gaming is a mode of transferring property without producing any intermediate good.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 6, 1772 (1791).
Money and time are the heaviest burdens of life, and ... the unhappiest of all mortals are those who have more of either than they know how to use.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt, and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 30, Universal Chronicle (London, November 11, 1758).
No government power can be abused long. Mankind will not bear it.... There is a remedy in human nature against tyranny, that will keep us safe under every form of government.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, Mar. 31, 1772 (1791).
At seventy-seven it is time to be in earnest.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. In Works of Samuel Johnson, Yale Edition, vol. 9, ed. Mary Lascelles (1971). Journey to the Western Isles of Scotland, "Col," (1775).
The greatest part of a writer's time is spent in reading, in order to write; a man will turn over half a library to make one book.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 6, 1775 (1791).
Wine makes a man better pleased with himself. I do not say that it makes him more pleasing to others.... This is one of the disadvantages of wine, it makes a man mistake words for thoughts.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 28, 1778 (1791).
As peace is the end of war, so to be idle is the ultimate purpose of the busy.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt, and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 1, Universal Chronicle (London, April 15, 1758). "Perhaps man," Johnson wrote, "is the only being that can properly be called idle."
Ah! Sir, a boy's being flogged is not so severe as a man's having the hiss of the world against him.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, July 21, 1763 (1791).
Virtue is too often merely local.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 53, Universal Chronicle (London, April 21, 1759).
Our tastes greatly alter. The lad does not care for the child's rattle, and the old man does not care for the young man's whore.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, spring 1776 (1791).