Samuel Johnson Quotes

Marriage has many pains, but celibacy has no pleasures.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Nekayah, in The History of Rasselas, ch. 26 (1759).
You are much surer that you are doing good when you pay money to those who work, as the recompense of their labour, than when you give money merely in charity.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, May 1776 (1791).
Parents and children seldom act in concert: each child endeavours to appropriate the esteem or fondness of the parents, and the parents, with yet less temptation, betray each other to their children.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Nekayah, in The History of Rasselas, ch. 26 (1759).
There are innumerable questions to which the inquisitive mind can in this state receive no answer: Why do you and I exist? Why was this world created? Since it was to be created, why was it not created sooner?
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, May 9, 1778 entry (1791).
The most fatal disease of friendship is gradual decay, or dislike hourly increased by causes too slender for complaint, and too numerous for removal.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 23, Universal Chronicle (London, Sept. 23, 1758).
Such is the state of life, that none are happy but by the anticipation of change: the change itself is nothing; when we have made it, the next wish is to change again. The world is not yet exhausted; let me see something tomorrow which I never saw before.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Nekayah, in The History of Rasselas, ch. 47 (1759).
I would not give half a guinea to live under one form of government rather than another. It is of no moment to the happiness of an individual.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, March 31, 1772 (1791).
In all pointed sentences, some degree of accuracy must be sacrificed to conciseness.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D., vol. 10, ed. Sir John Hawkins (1787) and Works of Samuel Johnson, Yale Edition, vol. 10. "On the Bravery of the English Common Soldier," The British Magazine (Jan. 1760).
Disappointment, when it involves neither shame nor loss, is as good as success; for it supplies as many images to the mind, and as many topics to the tongue.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Letter, June 26, 1775, to Hester Thrale. The Letters of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, no. 411, ed. R. W. Chapman (1952).
When men come to like a sea-life, they are not fit to live on land.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, March 18, 1776 (1791).