Samuel Johnson Quotes

Ah! Sir, a boy's being flogged is not so severe as a man's having the hiss of the world against him.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, July 21, 1763 (1791).
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Virtue is too often merely local.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 53, Universal Chronicle (London, April 21, 1759).
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Here falling houses thunder on your head, And here a female atheist talks you dead.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. London.
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Our tastes greatly alter. The lad does not care for the child's rattle, and the old man does not care for the young man's whore.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, spring 1776 (1791).
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Nothing is more hopeless than a scheme of merriment.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, Yale Edition, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 58, first published in Universal Chronicle (London, May 26, 1759).
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Prepare for death, if here at night you roam, And sign your will before you sup from home.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. "London."
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There may be other reasons for a man's not speaking in publick than want of resolution: he may have nothing to say.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 5, 1775 (1791).
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Criticism is a study by which men grow important and formidable at very small expense. The power of invention has been conferred by nature upon few, and the labour of learning those sciences which may, by mere labour, be obtained, is too great to be willingly endured; but every man can exert some judgment as he has upon the works of others; and he whom nature has made weak, and idleness keeps ignorant, may yet support his vanity by the name of critic.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, Yale Edition, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt, and L.F. Powell (1963). "The Idler," no. 60, Universal Chronicle (London, June 9, 1759).
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Cruel with guilt, and daring with despair, The midnight murderer bursts the faithless bar; Invades the sacred hour of silent rest And leaves, unseen, a dagger in your breast.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. London.
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Why, Sir, most schemes of political improvement are very laughable things.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, Oct. 26, 1769 (1791).
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