Samuel Taylor Coleridge Quotes

Every man is born an Aristotelian or a Platonist. I do not think it possible that anyone born an Aristotelian can become a Platonist; and I am sure that no born Platonist can ever change into an Aristotelian. They are two classes of man, beside which it is next to impossible to conceive a third. The one considers reason a quality or attribute; the other considers it a power.... Aristotle was, and still is, the sovereign lord of the understanding—the faculty judging by the senses. He was a conceptualist, and never could raise himself into that higher state, which was natural to Plato, and has been so to others, in which the understanding is distinctly contemplated, and, as it were, looked down upon from the throne of actual ideas, or living, inborn, essential truths.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. Specimens of the Table Talk of the Late Samuel Taylor Coleridge, entry for July 2, 1830 (1835).
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Women have their heads in their hearts. Man seems to have been destined for a superior being; as things are, I think women generally better creatures than men. They have weaker appetites and weaker intellects but much stronger affections. A man with a bad heart has been sometimes saved by a strong head; but a corrupt woman is lost forever.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. Specimens of the Table Talk of the Late Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1835).
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Brute animals have the vowel sounds; man only can utter consonants.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. Specimens of the Table Talk of the Late Samuel Taylor Coleridge, entry for Aug. 20, 1833 (1835).
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The definition of good prose is proper words in their proper places; of good verse, the most proper words in their proper places. The propriety is in either case relative. The words in prose ought to express the intended meaning, and no more; if they attract attention to themselves, it is, in general, a fault.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. Specimens of the Table Talk of the Late Samuel Taylor Coleridge, entry for July 3, 1833 (1835).
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Beneath this sod A poet lies, or that which once seem'd he.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Stop, Christian passer-by!—Stop, child of God (l. 2-3). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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Look through the whole history of countries professing the Romish religion, and you will uniformly find the leaven of this besetting and accursed principle of action—that the end will sanction any means.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. repr. In Collected Works, ed. Kathleen Coburn, vol. 14 (1990). Table Talk, Aug. 6, 1831, published in Specimens of the Table Talk of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ed. Henry Nelson Coleridge (1835).
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How deep a wound to morals and social purity has that accursed article of the celibacy of the clergy been! Even the best and most enlightened men in Romanist countries attach a notion of impurity to the marriage of a clergyman. And can such a feeling be without its effect on the estimation of the wedded life in general? Impossible! and the morals of both sexes in Spain, Italy, France, &c. prove it abundantly.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. repr. In Collected Works, vol. 14, ed. Kathleen Coburn (1990). "Table Talk," April 18, 1833, Specimens of the Table Talk of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ed. Henry Nelson Coleridge (1835).
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You see how this House of Commons has begun to verify all the ill prophecies that were made of it—low, vulgar, meddling with everything, assuming universal competency, and flattering every base passion—and sneering at everything noble refined and truly national. The direct tyranny will come on by and by, after it shall have gratified the multitude with the spoil and ruin of the old institutions of the land.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. repr. In Collected Works, vol. 14, ed. Kathleen Coburn (1990). Table Talk, April 8, 1833, Specimens of the Table Talk of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ed. Henry Nelson Coleridge (1835).
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In politics, what begins in fear usually ends in folly.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. repr. In Collected Works, vol. 14, ed. Kathleen Coburn (1990). Table Talk, "5 Oct 1830," Specimens of the Table Talk of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ed. Henry Nelson Coleridge (1835).
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How inimitably graceful children are in general before they learn to dance!
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. repr. In Collected Works, vol. 14, ed. Kathleen Coburn (1990). Table Talk, "1 Jan. 1832," Specimens of the Table Talk of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ed. Henry Nelson Coleridge (1835).
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