Samuel Taylor Coleridge Quotes

The three great ends which a statesman ought to propose to himself in the government of a nation, are,—1. Security to possessors; 2. Facility to acquirers; and, 3. Hope to all.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. repr. In Collected Works, vol. 14, ed. Kathleen Coburn (1990). "Table Talk," Specimens of the Table Talk of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ed. Henry Nelson Coleridge (1835).
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To most men, experience is like the stern lights of a ship, which illumine only the track it has passed.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. repr. In Collected Works, vol. 14, ed. Kathleen Coburn (1990). Table Talk, "1820," Letters and Conversations of S.T. Coleridge, vol. 1, "Thomas Allsop" (1836).
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The genius of the Spanish people is exquisitely subtle, without being at all acute; hence there is so much humour and so little wit in their literature.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. repr. In Collected Works, vol. 14, ed. Kathleen Coburn (1990). Table Talk, April 23, 1832, Specimens of the Table Talk of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ed. Henry Nelson Coleridge (1835).
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The principle of the Gothic architecture is infinity made imaginable.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. repr. In Collected Works, vol. 14, ed. Kathleen Coburn (1990). Table Talk, in Specimens of the Table Talk of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ed. Henry Nelson Coleridge (1835).
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My case is a species of madness, only that it is a derangement of the Volition, & not of the intellectual faculties.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. Letter, April 26, 1814. The Collected Letters of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, vol. 3 (1959). Referring to his addiction to laudanum.
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And the Devil did grin, for his darling sin Is pride that apes humility.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic, and Robert Southey (1774-1843), British writer,poet. The Devil's Thoughts (1799-1827), repr. In Poetical Works, ed. James Dyke Campbell (1893).
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And what if all of animated nature Be but organic Harps diversely framed, That tremble into thought, as o'er them sweeps Plastic and vast, one intellectual breeze, At once the Soul of each, and God of all?
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. The Eolian Harp (l. 45-49). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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O! the one Life within us and abroad,
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. The Eolian Harp (l. 27). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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The Knight's bones are dust, And his good sword rust:— His soul is with the saints, I trust.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. The Knight's Tomb (l. 9-11). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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I could not know Whether I suffered, or I did: For all seemed guilt, remorse or woe, My own or others still the same Life-stifling fear, soul-stifling shame.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. The Pains of Sleep (l. 28-32). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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