Samuel Taylor Coleridge Quotes

Yea, slimy things did crawl with legs Upon the slimy sea.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (l. 125-126). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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Her skin was white as leprosy, The nightmare Life-in-Death was she, Who thicks man's blood with cold.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, pt. 3, st. 11 (1798). Describing the skeleton-ship's crew.
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Water, water, everywhere, Nor any drop to drink.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (l. 121-122). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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Oh Sleep! it is a gentle thing, Beloved from pole to pole! To Mary Queen the praise be given! She sent the gentle sleep from Heaven, That slid into my soul.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, pt. 5, st. 1 (1798).
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We were the first that ever burst Into that silent sea.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (l. 105-106). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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Now an allegory is but a translation of abstract notions into a picture-language, which is itself nothing but an abstraction from objects of the senses; the principal being more worthless even than its phantom proxy, both alike unsubstantial, and the former shapeless to boot. On the other hand, a symbol is characterized by a translucence of the special in the individual, or of the general in the special, or of the universal in the general; above all though the translucense of the eternal through and in the temporal. It always partakes of the reality which it renders intelligible; and while it enunciates the whole, abides itself as a living part in that unity of which it is the representative.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. The Statesman's Manual (1816).
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Henceforth I shall know That Nature ne'er deserts the wise and pure;
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison (l. 59-60). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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my gentle-hearted Charles, to whom No sound is dissonant which tells of Life.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison (l. 75-76). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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This far outstripped the other; Yet ever runs she with reverted face, And looks and listens for the boy behind: For he, alas! is blind! O'er rough and smooth with even step he passed, And knows not whether he be first or last.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Time, Real and Imaginary (l. 6-11). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
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On the wide level of a mountain's head, (I knew not where, but 'twas some faery place), Their pinions, ostrich-like, for sails outspread, Two lovely children run an endless race,
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Time, Real and Imaginary (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
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