Samuel Taylor Coleridge Quotes

But oh! each visitation Suspends what nature gave me any my birth, My shaping spirit of Imagination.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Dejection; an Ode (l. 84-86). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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I see them all so excellently fair, I see, not feel, how beautiful they are!
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Dejection; an Ode (l. 37-38). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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And though thou notest from thy safe recess Old friends burn dim, like lamps in noisome air Love them for what they are; nor love them less, Because to thee they are not what they were.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. Duty Surviving Self-Love.
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Swans sing before they die—'twere no bad thing Should certain persons die before they sing.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. Epigram on a Bad Singer, Poetical Works, ed. James Dyke Campbell (1893).
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Forth from his dark and lonely hiding-place, (Portentous sight!) the owlet Atheism, Sailing on obscene wings athwart the noon, Drops his blue-fringed lids, and holds them close, And hooting at the glorious sun in Heaven, Cries out, "Where is it?"
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet, critic. Fears in Solitude, l. 81-6 (1798), repr. In Poetical Works, ed. James Dyke Campbell (1893).
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Only that film, which fluttered on the grate, Still flutters there, the sole unquiet thing.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Frost at Midnight (l. 15-16). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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the eave-drops fall Heard only in the trances of the blast, Or if the secret ministry of frost Shall hang them up in silent icicles, Quietly shining to the quiet Moon.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Frost at Midnight (l. 60-63). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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The lovely shapes and sounds intelligible Of that eternal language, which thy God Utters, who from eternity doth teach Himself in all, and all things in himself.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Frost at Midnight (l. 60-63). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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The Frost performs its secret ministry, Unhelped by any wind. The owlet's cry Came loud—and hark, again! loud as before.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Frost at Midnight (l. 1-3). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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Therefore all seasons shall be sweet to thee, Whether the summer clothe the general earth With greenness, or the redbreast sit and sing Betwixt the tufts of snow on the bare branch Of mossy apple-tree,
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834), British poet. Frost at Midnight (l. 60-63). . . Poems [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]. John Beer, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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