Sir Francis Bacon Quotes

Certainly the best works, and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried, or childless men.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Marriage and Single Life," Essays (1597).
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He that hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Marriage and Single Life," Essays (1597-1625).
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Children sweeten labours, but they make misfortunes more bitter.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British lawyer, philosopher and essayist. (1625). "Of Parents and Children," Essays.
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The joys of parents are secret, and so are their griefs and fears.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British lawyer, philosopher and essayist. "Of Parents and Children," Essays (1625).
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Certainly fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swoln, and drowns things weighty and solid.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, statesman. "Of Praise," The Essayes or Counsels (1625).
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Revenge is a kind of wild justice, which the more a man's nature runs to, the more ought law to weed it out.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Revenge," Essays (1597-1625). "A man that studieth revenge," Bacon added later in the essay, "keeps his own wounds green."
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I cannot call Riches better than the baggage of virtue. The Roman word is better, impedimenta. For as the baggage is to an army, so is riches to virtue. It cannot be spared nor left behind, but it hindereth the march; yea and the care of it sometimes loseth or disturbeth the victory.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British essayist, statesman. "Of Riches," The Essayes or Counsels (1625).
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The great advantages of simulation and dissimulation are three. First to lay asleep opposition and to surprise. For where a man's intentions are published, it is an alarum to call up all that are against them. The second is to reserve a man's self a fair retreat: for if a man engage himself, by a manifest declaration, he must go through, or take a fall. The third is, the better to discover the mind of another. For to him that opens himself, men will hardly show themselves adverse; but will fair let him go on, and turn their freedom of speech to freedom of thought.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Simulation and Dissimulation," Essays (1597-1625).
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Nakedness is uncomely, as well in mind as body, and it addeth no small reverence to men's manners and actions if they be not altogether open.... Therefore set it down: That a habit of secrecy is both politic and moral.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Simulation and Dissimulation," Essays (1597-1625).
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There is nothing makes a man suspect much, more than to know little.
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Suspicion," Essays (1597-1625).
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