Sir Walter Raleigh Quotes

But from this earth, this grave, this dust, My God shall raise me up, I trust.
Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?-1618), British poet. Even Such Is Time (l. 7-8). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
(12) (1)
O eloquent, just, and mighty Death! whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded; what none hath dared, thou hast done; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hath cast out of the world and despised. Thou hast drawn together all the far-stretched greatness, all the pride, cruelty, and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words, Hic jacet!
Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), British author, soldier, explorer. History of the World, bk. 5, pt. 1, ch. 6, sct. 12 (1614).
(4) (3)
Whoso taketh in hand to frame any state or government ought to presuppose that all men are evil, and at occasions will show themselves so to be.
Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), British author, soldier, explorer. repr. In The Works of Sir Walter Raleigh, vol. 1 (1751). "Maxims of State," ch. 26, The Cabinet Council.
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Be advised what thou dost discourse of, and what thou maintainest whether touching religion, state, or vanity; for if thou err in the first, thou shalt be accounted profane; if in the second, dangerous; if in the third, indiscreet and foolish.
Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), British author, soldier, explorer. repr. In The Works of Sir Walter Raleigh, vol. 2 (1751), also Advice to a Son (1962). "Private Quarrels to be Avoided," ch. 4, Instructions to His Son and to Posterity (1632).
(12) (2)
Fain would I climb, yet fear I to fall.
Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), British author, soldier, explorer. Quoted in History of the Worthies of England, "Devonshire," Thomas Fuller (1662). Line scratched with a diamond ring on a window-pane, to which Queen Elizabeth replied, using the same method, "If thy heart fail thee, climb not at all."
(13) (2)
Our passions are most like to floods and streams, The shallow murmur, but the deep are dumb.
Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), British author, soldier, explorer. Sir Walter Raleigh to the Queen, st. 1 (written c. 1599, published 1655).
(4) (2)
There is nothing exempt from the peril of mutation; the earth, heavens, and whole world is thereunto subject.
Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), British author, soldier, explorer. The Cabinet Council, ch. 24, "Of Civil War," The Works of Sir Walter Raleigh, vol. 1 (1751).
(10) (1)
Whosoever, in writing a modern history, shall follow truth too near the heels, it may haply strike out his teeth.
Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), British author, soldier, explorer. The History of the World, preface (1614). Raleigh's History was banned by James I soon after its publication, precisely because, it was alleged, Raleigh followed too closely the "heels of truth"Maccording to biographer Robert Lacey in Sir Walter Raleigh, ch. 41 (1973), Raleigh "took every opportunity he could in his book to pour scorn on famous sodomites, and James took the point."
(7) (4)
Go, Soul, the body's guest, Upon a thankless arrant: Fear not to touch the best; The truth shall be thy warrant: Go, since I needs must die, And give the world the lie.
Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?-1618), British poet. The Lie (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
(4) (1)
If all the world and love were young, And truth in every shepherd's tongue, These pretty pleasures might me move To live with thee and be thy Love.
Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?-1618), British poet. The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(5) (1)