Soren Kierkegaard Quotes

Personality is only ripe when a man has made the truth his own.
Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. The Journals of Soren Kierkegaard: A Selection, no. 432, 1843 entry, ed. and trans. by Alexander Dru (1938).
Adversity draws men together and produces beauty and harmony in life's relationships, just as the cold of winter produces ice-flowers on the window-panes, which vanish with the warmth.
Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1955), Danish philosopher. The Journals of Soren Kierkegaard: A Selection, no. 37, entry for January 1836, ed. and trans. by Alexander Dru (1938).
How ironical that it is by means of speech that man can degrade himself below the level of dumb creation—for a chatterbox is truly of a lower category than a dumb creature.
Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. The Last Years: Journals 1853-55, ed. and trans. by Ronald G. Smith (1965).
The truth is a snare: you cannot have it, without being caught. You cannot have the truth in such a way that you catch it, but only in such a way that it catches you.
Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. repr. In The Last Years: Journals 1853-55, ed. and trans. by Ronald G. Smith (1965). The Papers of Soren Kierkegaard, vol. 11, pt. 1, sct. 352, ed. P.A. Heiberg and V. Kuhr (1909).
Marriage brings one into fatal connection with custom and tradition, and traditions and customs are like the wind and weather, altogether incalculable.
Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "The Rotation Method," vol. 1, Either/Or (1843).
Far from idleness being the root of all evil, it is rather the only true good.
Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "The Rotation Method," vol. 1, Either/Or (1843).
I see it all perfectly; there are two possible situations—one can either do this or that. My honest opinion and my friendly advice is this: do it or do not do it—you will regret both.
Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "Balance between Esthetic and Ethical," vol. 2, Either/Or (1843, repr. 1987).
There are, as is known, insects that die in the moment of fertilization. So it is with all joy: life's highest, most splendid moment of enjoyment is accompanied by death.
Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "Diapsalmata," vol. 1, Either/Or (1843, trans. 1987).
What is a poet? An unhappy person who conceals profound anguish in his heart but whose lips are so formed that as sighs and cries pass over them they sound like beautiful music.
Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "Diapsalmata," vol. 1, opening lines, Either/Or (1843, trans. 1987).
In addition to my other numerous acquaintances, I have one more intimate confidant.... My depression is the most faithful mistress I have known—no wonder, then, that I return the love.
Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "Diapsalmata," vol. 1, Either/Or (1843, trans. 1987).