Theodore Roethke Quotes

I'm cold. I'm cold all over. Rub me in father and mother. Fear was my father, Father Fear. His look drained the stones.
Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), U.S. poet. The Lost Son (l. 74-76). . . Harvard Book of Contemporary American Poetry, The. Helen Vendler, ed. (1985) The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
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Do I imagine he no longer trembles When I come close to him? He seems no longer to tremble.
Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), U.S. poet. The Meadow Mouse (l. 18-20). . . Naked Poetry; Recent American Poetry in Open Forms. Stephen Berg and Robert Mezey, eds. (1969) The Bobbs-Merrill Company.
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A little quaker, the whole body of him trembling, His absurd whiskers sticking out like a cartoon-mouse, His feet like small leaves, Little lizard-feet, Whitish and spread wide when he tried to struggle away,
Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), U.S. poet. The Meadow Mouse (l. 6-10). . . Naked Poetry; Recent American Poetry in Open Forms. Stephen Berg and Robert Mezey, eds. (1969) The Bobbs-Merrill Company.
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I think of the nestling fallen into the deep grass, The turtle gasping in the dusty rubble of the highway, The paralytic stunned in the tub, and the water rising,— All things innocent, hapless, forsaken.
Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), U.S. poet. The Meadow Mouse (l. 27-30). . . Naked Poetry; Recent American Poetry in Open Forms. Stephen Berg and Robert Mezey, eds. (1969) The Bobbs-Merrill Company.
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bacterial creepers Wriggling through wounds Like elvers in ponds, Their wan mouths kissing the warm sutures, Cleaning and caressing, Creeping and healing.
Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), U.S. poet. The Minimal (l. 6-11). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
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The living all assemble! What's the cue?— Do what the clumsy partner wants to do!
Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), U.S. poet. The Partner (l. 41-42). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
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The body and the soul know how to play In that dark world where gods have lost their way.
Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), U.S. poet. The Partner (l. 47-48). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
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What is desire?— The impulse to make someone else complete? That woman would set sodden straw on fire.
Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), U.S. poet. The Partner (l. 26-28). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Time for the flat-headed man. I recognize that listener, Him with the platitudes and rubber doughnuts, Melting at the knees, a varicose horror. Hello, hello. My nerves knew you, dear boy. Have you come to unhinge my shadow?
Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), U.S. poet. The Shape of the Fire (l. 30-34). . . Longman Anthology of Contemporary American Poetry, The, 1950-1980. Stuart Friebert and David Young, eds. (1983) Longman.
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In moving-slow he has no Peer. You ask him something in his ear; He thinks about it for a Year;
Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), U.S. poet. The Sloth (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
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