Theodore Roszak (November 15, 1933 – July 5, 2011) was professor emeritus of history at California State University, East Bay. He is best known for his 1969 text, The Making of a Counter Culture.

Background

Roszak received his B.A. from UCLA and Ph.D. in History from Princeton University. He taught at Stanford University, the University of British Columbia, and San Francisco State University before joining CalState Hayward. During the 1960s, he lived in London, where he edited the newspaper Peace News.

Theodore Roszak died at age 77 at his home in Berkeley, California on July 5, 2011.

Scholarship

Roszak first came to public prominence in 1969, with the publication of his The Making of a Counter Culture which chronicled and gave explanation to the European and North American counterculture of the 1960s. He is generally credited with the first use of the term "counterculture".

Other books include include Longevity Revolution: As Boomers Become Elders, The Voice of the Earth (Touchstone Books), The Cult of Information, The Gendered Atom: Reflections on the Sexual Psychology of Science, The Voice of the Earth, and Ecopsychology: Healing the Mind, Restoring the Earth. With his wife Betty, he was co-editor of the anthology Masculine/Feminine: Essays on Sexual Mythology and the Liberation of Women.

His fiction includes a cult novel on the "secret history" of the cinema Flicker (Simon and Schuster, Bantam Books and Chicago Review Press) and the award-winning Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein (Random House and Bantam Books). His most recent novel, published in 2003, is The Devil and Daniel Silverman.

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