Thomas Campion Quotes

Lost is our freedom When we submit to women so: Why do we need 'em When, in their best, they work our woe?
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. Kind Are Her Answers (l. 10-13). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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Kind are her answers, But her performance keeps no day; Breaks time, as dancers, From their own music when they stray.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. Kind Are Her Answers (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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Thou all sweetness dost enclose Like a little world of bliss. Beauty guards thy looks: the rose In them pure and eternal is.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. My Life's Delight (l. 7-10). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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Love loves no delay;
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. My Life's Delight (l. 3). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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If all would lead their lives in love like me, Then bloody swords and armor should not be; No drum nor trumpet peaceful sleeps should move, Unless alarm came from the camp of love.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. My Sweetest Lesbia (l. 7-10). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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The summer hath his joys And winter his delights; Though love and all his pleasures are but toys, They shorten tedious nights.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. Now Winter Nights Enlarge (l. 21-24). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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Only beauty purely loving Knows no discord, But still moves delight, Like clear springs renewed by flowing, Ever perfect, ever in them- Selves eternal.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. Rose-cheeked Laura, Come (l. 11-16). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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But to let such dangers pass, Which a lover's thoughts disdain, 'Tis enough in such a place To attend love's joys in vain.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. Shall I Come, Sweet Love, to Thee? (L. 13-16). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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Shall I come, sweet Love, to thee, When the ev'ning beams are set?
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. Shall I Come, Sweet Love, to Thee? (L. 1-2). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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Plead, Sleep, my cause, and make her soft like thee, That she in peace may wake and pity me.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. Sleep, Angry Beauty (l. 11-12). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
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