Thomas Campion Quotes

The man whose silent days In harmless joys are spent, Whom hopes cannot delude, Nor sorrow discontent: That man needs neither towers Nor armour for defence, Nor secret vaults to fly From thunder's violence.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. The Man of Life Upright (l. 5-12). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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Yet them nor peer nor prince can buy, Till 'Cherry-ripe' themselves do cry.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. There Is a Garden in Her Face (l. 11-12). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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Thou shalt prove That beauty is no beauty without love.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. Thou Art Not Fair (l. 5-6). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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Thou art not fair, for all thy red and white, For all those rosy ornaments in thee. Thou art not sweet, though made of mere delight
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. Thou Art Not Fair (l. 1-3). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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From heav'nly thoughts all true delight doth spring.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. To Music Bent Is My Retired Mind (l. 4). . . New Oxford Book of Christian Verse, The. Donald Davie, ed. (1981) Oxford University Press.
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now I discerne they goe on a Pilgrimage Towards Loves holy land, faire Paphos or Cyprus. Such devotion is meete for a blithesome age; With sweet youth, it agrees well to be amorous. Let olde angrie fathers lurke in an Hermitage: Come, weele associate this jolly Pilgrimage!
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. What Faire Pompe (l. 25-30). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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All our joys Are but toys,
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. What If a Day (l. 9-10). . . Elizabethan Lyrics. Norman Ault, ed. (3d ed., 1949) William Sloane Associates (paperback edition of 1960 published by G. P. Putnam's Sons).
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Secret fates Guide our states Both in mirth and mourning.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. What If a Day (l. 26-28). . . Elizabethan Lyrics. Norman Ault, ed. (3d ed., 1949) William Sloane Associates (paperback edition of 1960 published by G. P. Putnam's Sons).
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Fortune, honour, beauty, youth, Are but blossoms dying; Wanton pleasures, doting love, Are but shadows flying.
Thomas Campion (1567-1620), British poet. What If a Day (l. 5-8). . . Elizabethan Lyrics. Norman Ault, ed. (3d ed., 1949) William Sloane Associates (paperback edition of 1960 published by G. P. Putnam's Sons).
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