Thomas Carew Quotes

Then, Celia, let us reap our joys Ere Time such goodly fruit destroys.
Thomas Carew (1589-1639), British poet. Persuasions to Enjoy (l. 5-6). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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If the quick spirits in your eye Now languish and anon must die;
Thomas Carew (1589-1639), British poet. Persuasions to Enjoy (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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Time with the season: only shee doth carry June in her eyes, in her heart January.
Thomas Carew (1589-1639), British poet. The Spring (l. 23-24). . . Poems of Thomas Carew. Arthur Vincent, ed. (1899; repr. 1972) Books for Libraries Press.
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Welcome the comming of the long'd-for May. Now all things smile; onely my Love doth lowre; Nor hath the scalding noon-day sunne the power To melt that marble yce, which still doth hold Her heart congeal'd, and makes her pittie cold.
Thomas Carew (1589-1639), British poet. The Spring (l. 12-16). . . Poems of Thomas Carew. Arthur Vincent, ed. (1899; repr. 1972) Books for Libraries Press.
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Then give me leave to love, & love me too Not with designe To raise, as Loves curst Rebels doe, When puling Poets whine, Fame to their beauty, from their blubbr'd eyn.
Thomas Carew (1589-1639), British poet. To a Lady That Desired I Would Love Her (l. 11-15). . . Poems of Thomas Carew. Arthur Vincent, ed. (1899; repr. 1972) Books for Libraries Press.
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When thou, poor Excommunicate From all the joys of love, shalt see The full reward and glorious fate Which my strong faith shall purchase me, Then curse thine own inconstancy!
Thomas Carew (1589-1639), British poet. To My Inconstant Mistress (l. 1-5). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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I press not to the quire, nor dare I greet The holy place with my unhallowed feet; My unwashed Muse pollutes not things divine, Nor mingles her profaner notes with thine; Here humbly at the porch she listening stays, And with glad ears sucks in thy sacred lays.
Thomas Carew (1589-1639), British poet. To My Worthy Friend Master George Sands, on His Translation of th Psalms (l. 1-6). . . Poems of Thomas Carew. Arthur Vincent, ed. (1899; repr. 1972) Books for Libraries Press.
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The weary pilgrim to thy roof; Where if, refresh'd, he will away, He's fairly welcome; or if stay, Far more; which he shall hearty find Both from the master and the hind.
Thomas Carew (1589-1639), British poet. To Saxham (l. 38-42). . . Poems of Thomas Carew. Arthur Vincent, ed. (1899; repr. 1972) Books for Libraries Press.
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Those cheerful beams send forth their light
Thomas Carew (1589-1639), British poet. To Saxham (l. 35). . . Poems of Thomas Carew. Arthur Vincent, ed. (1899; repr. 1972) Books for Libraries Press.
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