Thomas De Quincey Quotes

Tea, though ridiculed by those who are naturally coarse in their nervous sensibilities ... will always be the favourite beverage of the intellectual.
Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859), British author. Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, "The Pleasures of Opium," (1822).
If once a man indulges himself in murder, very soon he comes to think little of robbing; and from robbing he comes next to drinking and Sabbath-breaking, and from that to incivility and procrastination.
Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859), British author. Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts (1827).
If once a man indulges himself in murder, very soon he comes to think little of robbing; and from robbing he comes next to drinking and Sabbath-breaking, and from that to incivility and procrastination.
Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859), British author. Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine (1827). "Murder Considered As One of the Fine Arts," The Collected Writings of Thomas de Quincey, ed. D. Masson (1889).
In many walks of life, a conscience is a more expensive encumbrance than a wife or a carriage.
Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859), British author. "Preliminary Confessions," Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1822).
Thou hast the keys of Paradise, O just, subtle, and mighty opium!
Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859), British author. The Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, pt. 2, "The Pleasures of Opium," (1822).