Thomas Gray Quotes

Far from the sun and summer-gale In thy green lap was Nature's Darling laid, What time, where lucid Avon stray'd, To him the mighty mother did unveil Her awful face:
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 82-86). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
(17) (22)
Her track, where'er the Goddess roves, Glory pursue, and generous Shame, Th' unconquerable Mind, and Freedom's holy flame.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 62-64). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
(16) (17)
Now the rich stream of Music winds along Deep, majestic, smooth, and strong,
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 7-8). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
(10) (19)
Yet shall he mount, and keep his distant way Beyond the limits of a vulgar fate: Beneath the Good how far—but far above the Great.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 120-122). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
(10) (15)
O'er her warm cheek and rising bosom move The bloom of young desire and purple light of love.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. J. Rogers (1953). The Progress of Poesy, pt. 1, sct. 3, l. 16-7 (written 1754, published 1757).
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He saw: but blasted with excess of light, Closed his eyes in endless night.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 100-101). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
(1) (0)
Nor second He, that rode sublime Upon the seraph-wings of Ecstasy The secrets of the Abyss to spy:
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 94-96). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
(1) (0)
From Helicon's harmonious springs A thousand rills their mazy progress take:
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. The Progress of Poesy (l. 3-4). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
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Each in his narrow cell for ever laid, The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. "Elegy in a Country Churchyard," st. 4.
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Let not ambition mock their useful toil, Their homely joys, and destiny obscure; Nor grandeur hear with a disdainful smile, The short and simple annals of the poor.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. J. Rogers (1953). Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, st. 8 (1751).
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