Thomas Gray Quotes

Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife, Their sober wishes never learn'd to stray;
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard (l. 73-74). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
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The paths of glory lead but to the grave.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. J. Rogers (1953). Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, st. 9 (1751).
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The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea, The ploughman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world to darkness and to me. Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight, And all the air a solemn stillness holds, Save where the beetle wheels his droning flight, And drowsy tinklings lull the distant folds.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. J. Rogers (1953). Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, st. 1-2 (1751).
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Full many a gem of purest ray serene, The dark unfathom'd caves of ocean bear: Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, And waste its sweetness on the desert air.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard (l. 53-56). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
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Here rests his head upon the lap of Earth A Youth to Fortune and to Fame unknown, Fair Science frown'd not on his humble birth, And Melancholy mark'd him for her own.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard (l. 117-120). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
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Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife, Their sober wishes never learned to stray; Along the cool sequestered vale of life They kept the noiseless tenor of their way.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. J. Rogers (1953). Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, st. 19 (1751). referring to the village dead. Thomas Hardy took the title of his 1874 novel, Far from the Madding Crowd, from this stanza—"madding" here has the sense "becoming mad, acting madly, frenzied" (O.E.D.), rather than "maddening."
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The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea, The plowman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world to darkness and to me.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard (l. 1-4). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
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Where ignorance is bliss, 'Tis folly to be wise.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. J. Rogers (1953). Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College, l. 99-100 (written 1742, published 1747). Last lines.
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Ah happy hills! ah pleasing shade! Ah fields beloved in vain! Where once my careless childhood stray'd,
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College (l. 11-13). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
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No more;Mwhere ignorance is bliss 'Tis folly to be wise.
Thomas Gray (1716-1771), British poet. Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College (l. 98-99). . . Gray's English Poems; Original and Translated from the Norse and the Welsh [Thomas Gray]. D. C. Tovey, ed. (1922) Reprint Services.
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