Thomas Hardy Quotes

And yet to every bad there is a worse.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. The Woodlanders, ch. 34 (1887).
(135) (47)
a voice still so hollow That it seems to call out to me from forty years ago, When you were all aglow, And not the thin ghost that I now frailly follow!
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. After a Journey (l. 21-24). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
(2) (4)
It may be the more That no line of her writing have I, Nor a thread of her hair, No mark of her late time as dame in her dwelling, whereby I may picture her there.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Thoughts of Phena (l. 20-24). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
(2) (4)
you are leading me on To the spots we knew when we haunted here together,
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. After a Journey (l. 17-18). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
(2) (4)
And such are we— Unreasoning, sanguine, visionary— That I can hope Health, love, friends, scope In full for thee; can dream thou'lt find Joys seldom yet attained by humankind!
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. To an Unborn Pauper Child (l. 31-36). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
(2) (4)
Will this thought rise on those who will meet my face no more, "He was one who had an eye for such mysteries"?
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Afterwards (l. 15-16). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
(2) (4)
On Thursday morning going through the quiet woods it is not Thursday. To dwellers in a wood almost every species of tree has its voice as well as its feature. At the passing of the breeze the fir-trees sob and moan no less distinctly than they rock; the holly whistles as it battles with itself; the ash hisses amid its quiverings; the beech rustles while its flat boughs rise and fall. And winter, which modifies the note of such trees as shed their leaves, does not destroy its individuality.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Under the Greenwood Tree, ch. 1 (1872).
(2) (4)
will the neighbors say, "He was a man who used to notice such things"?
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Afterwards (l. 3-4). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
(3) (4)
There lies intact that chalice of ours, And its presence adds to the rhyme of love Persistently sung by the fall above. No lip has touched it since his and mine In turns therefrom sipped lover's wine."
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Under the Waterfall (l. 48-52). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
(2) (3)
"Ah, are you digging on my grave My beloved one?—planting rue?"
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Ah, Are You Digging on My Grave? (L. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
(3) (4)