Thomas Hardy Quotes

A resolution to avoid an evil is seldom framed till the evil is so far advanced as to make avoidance impossible.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Far from the Madding Crowd, ch. 18 (1874).
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One could say about this barn, what could hardly be said of either the church or the castle, akin to it in age and style, that the purpose which had dictated its original erection was the same with that to which it was still applied. Unlike and superior to either of those two typical remnants of mediaevalism, the old barn embodied practices which had suffered no mutilation at the hands of time. Here at least the spirit of the ancient builders was at one with the spirit of the modern beholder.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Far from the Madding Crowd, ch. XXII (1874).
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The Young Man's Best Companion, The Farrier's Sure Guide, The Veterinary Surgeon, Paradise Lost, The Pilgrim's Progress, Robinson Crusoe, Ash's Dictionary, and Walkingame's Arithmetic, constituted his library; and though a limited series, it was one from which he had acquired more sound information by diligent perusal than many a man of opportunities had done from a furlong of laden shelves.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Far from the Madding Crowd, ch. X (1874).
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at mothy curfew-tide, And at midnight when the noon-heat breathes it back from walls and leads, They've a way of whispering to me—fellow-wight who yet abide—
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Friends Beyond (l. 8-10). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
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If but some vengeful god would call to me From up the sky, and laugh: "Thou suffering thing, Know that thy sorrow is my ecstasy, That thy love's loss is my hate's profiting!"
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Hap (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
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Since as a child I used to lie Upon the leaze and watch the sky, Never, I own, expected I That life would all be fair.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. He Never Expected Much (l. 5-8). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
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The years-heired feature that can In curve and voice and eye Despise the human span Of durance—that is I; The eternal thing in man, That heeds no call to die.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Heredity (l. 7-12). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
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I am the family face; Flesh perishes, I live on, Projecting trait and trace Through time to times anon, And leaping from place to place Over oblivion.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Heredity, Moments of Vision (1917).
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Time, to make me grieve, Part steals, lets part abide; And shakes this fragile frame at eve With throbbings of noontide.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. I Look into My Glass (l. 9-12). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
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Only a man harrowing clods In a slow silent walk With an old horse that stumbles and nods Half asleep as they stalk.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. In Time of "The Breaking of Nations," (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
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