Thomas Henry Huxley Quotes

There is no sea more dangerous than the ocean of practical politics—none in which there is more need of good pilotage and of a single, unfaltering purpose when the waves rise high.
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95), British biologist and educator. Reflection #41, Aphorisms and Reflections, selected by Henrietta A. Huxley, Macmillan (London, 1907).
The doctrine that all men are, in any sense, or have been, at any time, free and equal, is an utterly baseless fiction.
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95), British biologist and educator. Reflection #42, Aphorisms and Reflections, selected by Henrietta A. Huxley, Macmillan (London, 1907).
The population question is the real riddle of the sphinx, to which no political Oedipus has as yet found the answer. In view of the ravages of the terrible monster over-multiplication, all other riddle sink into insignificance.
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95), British biologist and educator. Reflection #45, Aphorisms and Reflections, selected by Henrietta A. Huxley, Macmillan (London, 1907).
The very existence of society depends on the fact that every member of it tacitly admits he is not the exclusive possessor of himself, and that he admits the claim of the polity of which he forms a part, to act, to some extent, as his master.
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95), British biologist and educator. Reflection #48, Aphorisms and Reflections, selected by Henrietta A. Huxley, Macmillan (London, 1907).
Logical consequences are the scarecrows of fools and the beacons of wise men.
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895), British biologist. "On the Hypothesis that Animals are Automata," Science and Culture (1881).
Surely there is a time to submit to guidance and a time to take one's own way at all hazards.
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95), British biologist and educator. Reflection #49, Aphorisms and Reflections, selected by Henrietta A. Huxley, Macmillan (London, 1907).
No delusion is greater than the notion that method and industry can make up for lack of mother-wit, either in science or in practical life.
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95), British biologist and educator. Reflection #5, Aphorisms and Reflections, selected by Henrietta A. Huxley, Macmillan (London, 1907).
There is no sea more dangerous than the ocean of practical politics—none in which there is more need of good pilotage and of a single, unfaltering purpose when the waves rise high.
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895), British biologist. Published in Collected Essays, vol. 1 (1893). "On the Natural Inequality of Men," (1890).
Individualism, pushed to anarchy, in the family is as ill- founded theoretically and as mischievous practically as it is in the State; while extreme regimentation is a certain means of either destroying self-reliance or of maddening to rebellion.
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95), British biologist and educator. Reflection #50, Aphorisms and Reflections, selected by Henrietta A. Huxley, Macmillan (London, 1907).
Matter and force are the two names of the one artist who fashions the living as well as the lifeless.
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95), British biologist and educator. Reflection #55, Aphorisms and Reflections, selected by Henrietta A. Huxley, Macmillan (London, 1907).