Thomas Lovell Beddoes Quotes

I'll be a new bird with the head of an ass, Two pigs' feet, two men's feet, and two of a hen
Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849), British poet, physiologist. Death's Jest Book (l. 43-48). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
(5) (15)
We have bathed, where none have seen us, In the lake and in the fountain, Underneath the charmed statue Of the timid, bending Venus,
Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849), British poet, physiologist. Death's Jest Book (l. 43-48). . . New Oxford Book of Victorian Verse, The. Christopher Ricks, ed. (1987) Oxford University Press.
(7) (13)
Old Adam, the carrion crow,
Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849), British poet, physiologist. Death's Jest Book (l. 43-48). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(4) (9)
But wilt thou cure thine heart Of love and all its smart, Then die, dear, die;
Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849), British poet, physiologist. Death's Jest Book (l. 43-48). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
(8) (10)
Squats on a toad-stool under a tree A bodiless childfull of life in the gloom, Crying with frog voice, "What shall I be? Poor unborn ghost, for my mother killed me Scarcely alive in her wicked womb.
Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849), British poet, physiologist. Death's Jest Book (l. 43-48). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
(4) (0)
Is that the wind dying? O no; It's only two devils, that blow Through a murderer's bones, to and fro, In the ghosts' moonshine.
Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849), British poet, physiologist. Death's Jest Book (l. 43-48). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(1) (1)
The swallow leaves her nest, The soul my weary breast;
Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849), British poet, physiologist. Death's Jest Book (l. 43-48). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
(1) (1)
We are afraid They would envy our delight, In our graves by glow-worm night.
Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849), British poet, physiologist. Death's Jest Book (l. 43-48). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
(1) (1)
If there were dreams to sell, Merry and sad to tell, And the crier rung the bell, What would you buy?
Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849), British poet, physiologist. Dream-Pedlary (l. 43-48). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
(2) (1)
Hard by the lilied Nile I saw A duskish river dragon stretched along. The brown habergeon of his limbs enamelled With sanguine alamandines and rainy pearl: And on his back there lay a young one sleeping, No bigger than a mouse;
Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849), British poet, physiologist. The Last Man (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Travel Verse, The. Kevin Crossley-Holland, ed. (1986) Oxford University Press.
(2) (1)