Thomas Mann (6 June 1875 – 12 August 1955) was a German novelist, short story writer, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and 1929 Nobel Prize laureate, known for his series of highly symbolic and ironic epic novels and novellas, noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and the intellectual. His analysis and critique of the European and German soul used modernized German and Biblical stories, as well as the ideas of Goethe, Nietzsche, and Schopenhauer. Mann was a member of the Hanseatic Mann family, and portrayed his own family in the novel Buddenbrooks. His older brother was the radical writer Heinrich Mann, and three of his six children, Erika Mann, Klaus Mann and Golo Mann, also became important German writers. When Hitler came to power in 1933, Mann fled to Switzerland. When World War II broke out in 1939, he emigrated to the United States, whence he returned to Switzerland in 1952. Thomas Mann is one of the best-known exponents of the so-called Exilliteratur.

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Thomas Mann Poems

Thomas Mann Quotes

Six months at most after they get here, these young people—and they are mostly young who come—have lost every idea they had, except flirtation and temperature.
Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 5, p. 198, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Settembrini's critique of the Magic Mountain Society.
Psycho-analyses—how disgusting.
Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 1, p. 9, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). The author's and the protagonist Hans Castorp's early fear and ridicule of Freudian psychoanalysis.
Paradox is the poisonous flower of quietism, the iridescent surface of the rotting mind, the greatest depravity of all.
Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 5, pp. 221-222, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Settembrini warning Hans Castorp of paradox.

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glenda bowen 27 Mar 10:12
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