Thomas Moore Quotes

It is only to the happy that tears are a luxury.
Thomas Moore (1779-1852), Irish poet. "Prologue No. 2," Lalla Rookh.
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When he who adores thee has left but the name Of his fault and his sorrows behind, O! say wilt thou weep, when they darken the fame Of a life that for thee was resign'd!
Thomas Moore (1779-1852), Irish poet. Pro Patria Mori (l. 1-4). . . How Does a Poem Mean? John Ciardi and Miller Williams, eds. (2d ed., 1975) Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Rich and rare were the gems she wore, And a bright gold ring on her hand she bore.
Thomas Moore (1779-1852), Irish poet. Rich and Rare Were the Gems She Wore (l. 1-2).
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The harp that once through Tara's halls The soul of music shed, Now hangs as mute on Tara's walls As if that soul were fled.
Thomas Moore (1779-1852), Irish poet. repr. In Moore's Poetical Works, ed. A.D. Godley (1910). "The Harp that Once Through Tara's Halls," st. 1, Irish Melodies (1807).
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And hearts that once beat high for praise Now feel that pulse no more!
Thomas Moore (1779-1852), Irish poet. The Harp That Once through Tara's Halls (l. 7-8). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
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There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet;
Thomas Moore (1779-1852), Irish poet. The Meeting of the Waters (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Book of Light Verse, The. W. H. Auden, ed. (1938) Oxford University Press.
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'Twas that friends, the belov'd of my bosom, were near, Who made every dear scene of enchantment more dear,
Thomas Moore (1779-1852), Irish poet. The Meeting of the Waters (l. 9-10). . . Oxford Book of Light Verse, The. W. H. Auden, ed. (1938) Oxford University Press.
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The Minstrel Boy to the war is gone In the ranks of death you'll find him, His father's sword he has girded on, And his wild harp slung behind him.
Thomas Moore (1779-1852), Irish poet. The Minstrel Boy (l. 1-4). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.
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My only books were womans looks And follys all they taught me.
Thomas Moore (1779-1852), Irish poet. repr. In Moores Poetical Works, ed. A.D. Godley (1910). "The time Ive lost in wooing," st. 1, Irish Melodies (1807).
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