Thomas Traherne Quotes

All appeared new, and strange at first, inexpressibly rare and delightful and beautiful. I was a little stranger, which at my entrance into the world was saluted and surrounded with innumerable joys. My knowledge was divine. I knew by intuition those things which since my Apostasy, I collected again by the highest reason.
Thomas Traherne (1636-1674), British clergyman, poet, mystic. Centuries of Meditations, "Third Century," no. 2 (written c. 1672, first published 1908).
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This moment exhibits infinite space, but there is a space also wherein all moments are infinitely exhibited, and the everlasting duration of infinite space is another region and room of joys.
Thomas Traherne (1636-1674), British clergyman, poet, mystic. "Fifth Century," no. 6, Centuries (written c. 1672, published 1908).
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An empty book is like an infant's soul, in which anything may be written. It is capable of all things, but containeth nothing. I have a mind to fill this with profitable wonders.
Thomas Traherne (1636-1674), British clergyman, poet, mystic. "First Century," no. 1, Centuries (written c. 1672, first published 1908).
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I will not by the noise of bloody wars and the dethroning of kings advance you to glory: but by the gentle ways of peace and love.
Thomas Traherne (1636-1674), British clergyman, poet, mystic. "First Century," no. 4, Centuries (written c. 1672, first publ. 1908).
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Your enjoyment of the world is never right, till every morning you awake in Heaven: see yourself in your Father's palace; and look upon the skies, the earth, and the air as celestial joys: having such a reverend esteem of all, as if you were among the angels.
Thomas Traherne (1636-1674), British clergyman, poet, mystic. "First Century," no. 28, Centuries (written c. 1672, published 1908).
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You never know yourself till you know more than your body.
Thomas Traherne (1636-1674), British clergyman, poet, mystic. "First Century," no. 19, Centuries (written c. 1672, first published 1908).
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The soul is made for action, and cannot rest till it be employed. Idleness is its rust. Unless it will up and think and taste and see, all is in vain.
Thomas Traherne (1636-1674), British clergyman, poet, mystic. "Fourth Century," no. 95, Centuries (1908). Written c. 1672.
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More company increases happiness, but does not lighten or diminish misery.
Thomas Traherne (1636-1674), British clergyman, poet, mystic. Written (c. 1672). "Fourth Century," no. 14, Centuries (1908).
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To love one person with a private love is poor and miserable: to love all is glorious.
Thomas Traherne (1636-1674), British clergyman, poet, mystic. (First published 1908). "Fourth Century," no. 69, Centuries (written c. 1672).
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Had we not loved ourselves at all, we could never have been obliged to love anything. So that self-love is the basis of all love.
Thomas Traherne (1636-1674), British clergyman, poet, mystic. "Fourth Century," no. 55, Centuries (written c. 1672, publ. 1908).
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