Walt Whitman Quotes

Give me the splendid silent sun with all his beams full-dazzling, Give me juicy autumnal fruit ripe and red from the orchard, Give me a field where the unmow'd grass grows, Give me an arbor, give me the trellis'd grape, Give me fresh corn and wheat, give me serene-moving animals teaching content,
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun (l. 1-5). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Why are there trees I never walk under but large and melodious thoughts descend upon me?
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "Song of the Open Road," sct. 7 (1856).
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(O I see what I sought to escape, confronting, reversing my cries, I see my own soul trampling down what it ask'd for.) Keep your splendid silent sun, Keep your woods O Nature, and the quiet places by the woods, Keep your fields of clover and timothy, and your corn-fields and orchards, Keep the blossoming buckwheat fields where the Ninth-month bees hum; Give me faces and streets—give me these phantoms incessant and endless along the trottoirs!
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun (l. 18-24). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Old age, calm, expanded, broad with the haughty breadth of the universe, Old age flowing free with the delicious near-by freedom of death.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of the Open Road, verse 12 (1856).
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Manhattan streets with their powerful throbs, with beating drums as now, The endless and noisy chorus, the rustle and clank of muskets, (even the sight of the wounded,) Manhattan crowds, with their turbulent musical chorus! Manhattan faces and eyes forever for me.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun (l. 37-40). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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In this broad earth of ours, Amid the measureless grossness and the slag, Enclosed and safe within its central heart, Nestles the seed perfection.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "Song of the Universal."
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These demanding to have them, (tired with ceaseless excitement, and rack'd by the war-strife,) These to procure incessantly asking, rising in cries from my heart, While yet incessantly asking still I adhere to my city, Day upon day and year upon year O city, walking your streets, Where you hold me enchain'd a certain time refusing to give me up,
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun (l. 12-16). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Rugged, mountainous, volcanic, he was himself more a French revolution than any of his volumes.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Specimen Days (Feb. 10, 1881).
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Yet let me not be too hasty, Long indeed have we lived, slept, filtered, become really blended into one;
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Good-bye My Fancy! (L. 11-12). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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I will put in my poems, that with you is heroism, upon land and sea—And I will report all heroism from an American point of view.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Starting From Paumanok, sct. 7.
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