Walt Whitman Quotes

And there is no trade or employment but the young man following it may become a hero.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself, sect. 48, Leaves of Grass (1855).
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Was seiz'd by the spirit that trails in the lines underfoot, The rim, the sediment that stands for all the water and all the land of the globe. Fascinated, my eyes reverting from the south, dropt, to follow those slender windrows, Chaff, straw, splinters of wood, weeds, and the sea-gluten, Scum, scales from shining rocks, leaves of salt-lettuce, left by the tide,
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. As I Ebb'd with the Ocean of Life (l. 8-12). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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The city sleeps and the country sleeps, The living sleep for their time, the dead sleep for their time, The old husband sleeps by his wife and the young husband sleeps by his wife; And these tend inward to me, and I tend outward to them, And such as it is to be of these more or less I am, And of these one and all I weave the song of myself.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "Song of Myself," sct. 15, Leaves of Grass (1855).
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Three forms I see on stretchers lying, brought out there untended lying, Over each the blanket spread, ample brownish woolen blanket, Gray and heavy blanket, folding, covering all.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim (l. 4-6). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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He most honors my style who learns under it to destroy the teacher.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "Song of Myself," sct. 47, Leaves of Grass (1855).
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Then to the third—a face nor child nor old, very calm, as of beautiful yellow-white ivory, Young man I think I know you—I think this face is the face of the Christ himself, Dead and divine and brother of all, and here again he lies.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim (l. 13-15). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Seasons pursuing each other the indescribable crowd is gathered, it is the fourth of Seventh-month, (what salutes of cannon and small arms!)
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself, sct. 15, Leaves of Grass (1855).
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Sex contains all, bodies, souls, Meanings, proofs, purities, delicacies, results, promulgations, Songs, commands, health, pride, the maternal mystery, the seminal milk, All hopes, benefactions, bestowals, all the passions, loves, beauties, delights of the earth.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "A Woman Waits for Me."
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Have you heard that it was good to gain the day? I also say it is good to fall, battles are lost in the same spirit in which they are won.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself, sect. 18, Leaves of Grass (1855).
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Beat! beat! drums!—blow! bugles! blow! Through the windows—through doors—burst like a ruthless force, Into the solemn church, and scatter the congregation; Into the school where the scholar is studying; Leave not the bridegroom quiet—no happiness must he have now with his bride; Nor the peaceful farmer any peace, plough his field or gathering his grain; So fierce you whirr and pound, you drums—so shrill you bugles blow.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Beat! Beat! Drums! (L. 1-7). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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