Walt Whitman Quotes

Would you hear of an old-time sea-fight? Would you learn who won by the light of the moon and stars? List to the yarn, as my grandmother's father the sailor told it to me.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself (Fr. XXXV, l. 897-899). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Mind not the old man beseeching the young man; Let not the child's voice be heard, nor the mother's entreaties; Make even the trestles to shake the dead, where they lie awaiting the hearses, So strong you thump, O terrible drums—so loud you bugles blow.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Beat! Beat! Drums! (L. 18-21). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "Song of Myself," sct. 31, Leaves of Grass (1855).
(21) (15)
And over all the sky—the sky! far, far out of reach, studded, breaking out, the eternal stars.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Bivouac on a Mountain Side (l. 1-3). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Seas of bright juice suffuse heaven. The earth by the sky staid with, the daily close of their junction, The heav'd challenge from the east that moment over my head, The mocking taunt, See then whether you shall be master!
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself (Fr. XXIV, l. 556-559). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(2) (1)
I see before me now a traveling army halting, Below a fertile valley spread, with barns and the orchards of summer, Behind, the terraced sides of a mountain, abrupt, in places rising high,
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Bivouac on a Mountain Side (l. 1-3). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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I believe in you my soul, the other I am must not abase itself to you, And you must not be abased to the other.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself (Fr. V, l. 82-83). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(2) (1)
By the bivouac's fitful flame, A procession winding around me, solemn and sweet and slow
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. By the Bivouac's Fitful Flame (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Twenty-eight young men bathe by the shore, Twenty-eight young men and all so friendly;
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself (Fr. XI, l. 199-200). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(2) (1)
The shrubs and trees, (as I lift my eyes they seem to be stealthily watching me.) While wind in procession thoughts, O tender and wondrous thoughts, Of life and death, of home and the past and loved, and of those that are far away;
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. By the Bivouac's Fitful Flame (l. 6-8). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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