Walt Whitman Quotes

The young men float on their backs, their white bellies bulge to the sun, they do not ask who seizes fast to them, They do not know who puffs and declines with pendant and bending arch, They do not think whom they souse with spray.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself (Fr. XI, l. 199-200). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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O the joy of the strong-brawn'd fighter, towering in the arena in perfect condition, conscious of power, thirsting to meet his opponent.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "Calamus: A Song of Joys," Leaves of Grass (1855).
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You will hardly know who I am or what I mean, But I shall be good health to you nevertheless, And filter and fibre your blood. Failing to fetch me at first keep encouraged, Missing me one place search another, I stop somewhere waiting for you.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself (Fr. LII, l. 1341-1346). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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O the orator's joys! To inflate the chest, to roll the thunder of the voice out from the ribs and throat, To make the people rage, weep, hate, desire, with yourself, To lead America—to quell America with a great tongue.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "Calamus: A Song of Joys," Leaves of Grass (1855).
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Serene stands the little captain, He is not hurried, his voice is neither high nor low, His eyes give more light to us than our battle-lanterns. Toward twelve there in the beams of the moon they surrender to us.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself (Fr. XXXV, l. 925-928). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Scarlet, and blue, and snowy white, The guidon flags flutter gaily in the wind.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Cavalry Crossing a Ford (l. 6-7). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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The beautiful uncut hair of graves.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "Song of Myself," sct. 6, Leaves of Grass (1855).
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A line in long array, where they wind betwixt green islands; They take a serpentine course—their arms flash in the sun—hark to the musical clank;
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Cavalry Crossing a Ford (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Press close bare-bosom'd night—press close magnetic nourishing night! Night of south winds! night of the large few stars! Still nodding night! mad naked summer night.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "Song of Myself," sct. 21, Leaves of Grass (1855).
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While they stand at home at the door he is dead already, The only son is dead. But the mother needs to be better, She with thin form presently drest in black, By day her meals untouch'd, then at night fitfully sleeping, often waking, In the midnight waking, weeping, longing with one deep longing, O that she might withdraw unnoticed, silent from life escape and withdraw, To follow, to seek, to be with her dear dead son.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Come Up from the Fields, Father (l. 30-37). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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