Walt Whitman Quotes

When lilacs last in the dooryard bloomed And the great star early drooped in the western sky in the night, I mourned, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring. Ever-returning spring, trinity sure to me you bring, Lilac blooming perennial and drooping star in the west, And thought of him I love.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Memories of President Lincoln (l. 18-20). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(2) (0)
Thy madly-whistled laughter, echoing, rumbling like an earthquake, rousing all, Law of thyself complete, thine own track firmly holding, (No sweetness debonair of tearful harp or glib piano thine,) Thy trills of shrieks by rocks and hills return'd, Launch'd o'er the prairies wide, across the lakes, To the free skies unpent and glad and strong.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. To a Locomotive in Winter (l. 20-25). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(2) (0)
In the swamp in secluded recesses, A shy and hidden bird is warbling a song. Solitary the thrush, The hermit withdrawn to himself, avoiding the settlements, Sings by himself a song. Song of the bleeding throat, Death's outlet song of life, (for well dear brother I know, If thou wast not granted to sing thou would'st surely die.)
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Memories of President Lincoln (l. 18-20). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(1) (0)
I see in you the estuary that enlarges and spreads itself grandly as it pours in the great sea.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. To Old Age.
(1) (0)
O western orb sailing the heaven, Now I know what you must have meant as a month since I walked, As I walked in silence the transparent shadowy night,
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Memories of President Lincoln (l. 18-20). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(1) (0)
Thou who hast slept all night upon the storm, Waking renew'd on thy prodigious pinions,
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. To the Man-of-War-Bird (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(3) (0)
O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done, The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won, The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting, While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring; But O heart! heart! heart! O the bleeding drops of red, Where on the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Memories of President Lincoln (l. 18-20). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(5) (2)
Thou born to match the gale, (thou art all wings,) To cope with heaven and earth and sea and hurricane,
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. To the Man-of-War-Bird (l. 14-15). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(2) (1)
I cease my song for thee, From my gaze on thee in the west, fronting the west, communing with thee, O comrade lustrous with silver face in the night. Yet each to keep and all, retrievements out of the night, The song, the wondrous chant of the grey-brown bird, And the tallying chant, the echo aroused in my soul, With the lustrous and drooping star with the countenance full of woe,
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Memories of President Lincoln (l. 18-20). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(1) (0)
That sport'st amid the lightning-flash and thunder-cloud, In them, in thy experiences, had'st thou my soul, What joys! what joys were thine!
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. To the Man-of-War-Bird (l. 19-21). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
(1) (0)