Walt Whitman Quotes

I see her close beside me with silent lips sad and tremulous.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Once I Pass'd through a Populous City (l. 7). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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When I heard the learn'd astronomer, When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me,
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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From the beach the child holding the hand of her father, Those burial clouds that lower victorious soon to devour all, Watching, silently weeps.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. On the Beach at Night (l. 11-13). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick, Till rising and gliding out, I wander'd off by myself, In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time, Look'd up in perfect silence at the stars.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer (l. 5-8). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Then dearest child mournest thou only for Jupiter? Considerest thou alone the burial of the stars?
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. On the Beach at Night (l. 23-24). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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When I, sitting, heard the astronomer, where he lectured with such applause in the lecture room, How soon, unaccountable, I became tired and sick; Till rising and gliding out, I wander'd off by myself, In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time, Look'd up in perfect silence at the stars.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer."
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Something there is more immortal even than the stars, (Many the burials, many the days and nights, passing away,) Something that shall endure longer even than lustrous Jupiter, Longer than sun or any revolving satellite, Or the radiant sisters the Pleiades.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. On the Beach at Night (l. 28-32). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Come lovely and soothing death, Undulate round the world, serenely arriving, arriving, In the day, in the night, to all, to each, Sooner or later, delicate death.
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloomed, st. 14 (1881).
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On the beach at night, Stands a child with her father, Watching the east, the autumn sky. Up through the darkness, While ravening clouds, the burial clouds, in black masses spreading, Lower sullen and fast athwart and down the sky,
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. On the Beach at Night (l. 1-6). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.
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Youth, large, lusty, loving—Youth, full of grace, force, fascination. Do you know that Old Age may come after you with equal grace, force, fascination?
Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Youth, Day, Old Age and Night.
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