Walter Lippmann Quotes

When men can no longer be theists, they must, if they are civilized, become humanists.
Walter Lippmann (1889-1974), U.S. journalist. A Preface to Morals, pt. 1, ch. 7, sect. 7 (1929).
When philosophers try to be politicians they generally cease to be philosophers.
Walter Lippmann (1889-1974), U.S. journalist. A Preface to Politics, ch. 3 (1914).
There is nothing so bad but it can masquerade as moral.
Walter Lippmann (1889-1974), U.S. journalist. A Preface to Politics, ch. 6 (1914).
Football strategy does not originate in a scrimmage: it is useless to expect solutions in a political compaign.
Walter Lippmann (1889-1974), U.S. journalist. A Preface to Politics, ch. 3 (1914).
The best servants of the people, like the best valets, must whisper unpleasant truths in the master's ear. It is the court fool, not the foolish courtier, whom the king can least afford to lose.
Walter Lippmann (1889-1974), U.S. journalist. A Preface to Politics, ch. 6 (1914).
We forge gradually our greatest instrument for understanding the world—introspection. We discover that humanity may resemble us very considerably—that the best way of knowing the inwardness of our neighbors is to know ourselves.
Walter Lippmann (1889-1974), U.S. journalist. A Preface to Politics, ch. 4 (1914).
This is one of the paradoxes of the democratic movement—that it loves a crowd and fears the individuals who compose it—that the religion of humanity should have no faith in human beings.
Walter Lippmann (1889-1974), U.S. journalist. A Preface to Politics, ch. 1 (1914).
Success makes men rigid and they tend to exalt stability over all the other virtues; tired of the effort of willing they become fanatics about conservatism.
Walter Lippmann (1889-1974), U.S. journalist. A Preface to Politics, ch. 1 (1913).
Unless the reformer can invent something which substitutes attractive virtues for attractive vices, he will fail.
Walter Lippmann (1889-1974), U.S. journalist. A Preface to Politics, ch. 2 (1913).
Our conscience is not the vessel of eternal verities. It grows with our social life, and a new social condition means a radical change in conscience.
Walter Lippmann (1889-1974), U.S. journalist. A Preface to Politics, ch. 6 (1914).