Walter Savage Landor Quotes

A solitude is the audience-chamber of God.
Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British author. "Lord Brooke and Sir Philip Sidney," Imaginary Conversations (1824-1829).
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Every sect is a moral check on its neighbour. Competition is as wholesome in religion as in commerce.
Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British author. "Martin and Jack," Imaginary Conversations (1824-1829).
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Mother, I cannot mind my wheel; My fingers ache, my lips are dry:
Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Mother, I Cannot Mind (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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No longer could I doubt him true All other men may use deceit; He always said my eyes were blue, And often swore my lips were sweet.
Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Mother, I Cannot Mind (l. 5-8). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(3) (1)
Stand close around,ye Stygian set, With Dirce in one boat convey'd, Or Charon, seeing, may forget That he is old, and she a shade.
Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Pericles and Aspasia (l. 5-8). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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But when we play the fool, how wide The theatre expands! beside, How long the audience sits before us! How many prompters! what a chorus!
Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Plays (l. 5-8). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Rose Aylmer, whom these wakeful eyes May weep, but never see, A night of memories and of sighs I consecrate to thee.
Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. Rose Aylmer (l. 5-8). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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George the First was always reckoned Vile, but viler George the Second; And what mortal ever heard Any good of George the Third? When from earth the Fourth descended (God be praised!) the Georges ended.
Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. The Georges (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Satirical Verse, The. Geoffrey Grigson, comp. (1980) Oxford University Press.
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For, surely, surely, where Your voice and graces are, Nothing of death can any feel or know.
Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. The Hellenics (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
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I strove with none, for none was worth my strife: Nature I loved, and next to Nature, Art:
Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British poet. The Last Fruit Off an Old Tree (l. 7-10). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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